HistoryNet.com RSS
ArmchairGeneral.com RSS

HistoryNet.com Articles
America's Civil War
American History
Aviation History
Civil War Times
MHQ
Military History
Vietnam
Wild West
World War II

ACG Online
ACG Magazine
Stuff We Like
War College
History News
Tactics 101
Carlo D'Este
Books

ACG Gaming
Boardgames
PC Game Reviews

ACG Network
Contact Us
Our Newsletter
Meet Our Staff
Advertise With Us

Sites We Support
HistoryNet.com
StreamHistory.com
Once A Marine
The Art of Battle
Game Squad
Mil. History Podcast
Russian Army - WW2
Achtung Panzer!
Mil History Online

Go Back   Armchair General and HistoryNet >> The Best Forums in History > Historical Events & Eras > American Age of Discovery, Colonization, Revolution, & Expansion > American Revolution

Notices and Announcements

American Revolution 1763-1789 The birth of a new nation - to commence at the Proclaimation of 1763 to the end of the Articles of Confederation.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 19 Apr 04, 14:53
hogdriver's Avatar
hogdriver hogdriver is offline
Lieutenant General
United_States
ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Minot, North Dakota
Posts: 3,703
hogdriver is on the path to success [1-99]
Lexington & Concord

On this day, 229 years ago, our forefathers stood up to the redcoats at Concord and Lexington. This was the real spark that ignited the Revolutionary War. I think that on this day, we should all salute those men who made our independence a reality, and gave us the freedoms, rights and privileges that we enjoy today.
__________________
Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
(The Mind Is The Key To Victory)
Reply With Quote
Facebook Connect and Magazine Promotions

World War II Magazine
$26.95

Armchair General Magazine
$26.95
Military History Magazine
$26.95
  #2  
Old 19 Apr 04, 15:51
HiredGoon's Avatar
HiredGoon HiredGoon is offline
ACG Forums - General Staff
United_States
Distinguished Service Award ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: The third coast
Posts: 1,992
HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200]
It's Patriot's Day!

"Stand your ground.
Don't fire unless fired upon.
But, if they mean to have a war, let it begin here."


---- Captain John Parker, Lexington Militia, April 19th, 1775 on Lexington Green.

On April 19th, 1775, American militia, training bands, and minute men thoroughly beat the crap out of the best of Boston's British garrison (light infantry, marines and grenadiers).
__________________
"The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 19 Apr 04, 19:48
paul mullin's Avatar
paul mullin paul mullin is offline
Staff Sergeant
United_States
ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: new york
Posts: 151
paul mullin is a balanced individual [0]
Quote:
Originally posted by HiredGoon
It's Patriot's Day!

"Stand your ground.
Don't fire unless fired upon.
But, if they mean to have a war, let it begin here."


---- Captain John Parker, Lexington Militia, April 19th, 1775 on Lexington Green.

On April 19th, 1775, American militia, training bands, and minute men thoroughly beat the crap out of the best of Boston's British garrison (light infantry, marines and grenadiers).
Not quite, the militia got thier butts kicked at Lexington green, and the British took heavy losses on the return to Boston from harrasing fire.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 19 Apr 04, 21:55
HiredGoon's Avatar
HiredGoon HiredGoon is offline
ACG Forums - General Staff
United_States
Distinguished Service Award ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: The third coast
Posts: 1,992
HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200]
What I'm talking about is the Battle of Lexington and Concord in total, not just Lexington Green. Initially the training bands and minute men at Lexington Green fell back, but they regrouped and engaged the British on their return from Concord at the county line (the militia volley took Pitcairn's horse out from under him:thumb: ) At Concord bridge the Americans showed superior discipline than the British light infantry, and effectually "crossed the T" inflicting heavy casualties and routing the British back to Concord green. On the return march to Boston from Concord the British took much more than just harrassing fire from the Americans. The Americans continually showed a high degree of discipline and engaged the British on their own terms using unit formations and firing massed volleys. Not the old myth of farmers hiding behind trees, independantly taking pot shots.
__________________
"The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 21 Apr 04, 10:51
Janos's Avatar
Janos Janos is offline
General of the Forums
Hungary
Distinguished Service Award ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Real Name: János ispán Vezérőrnagy
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Fredericksburg, Virginia (CSA)
Posts: 14,853
Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700]
Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700]
Quote:
Originally posted by paul mullin
Not quite, the militia got thier butts kicked at Lexington green, and the British took heavy losses on the return to Boston from harrasing fire.
The true lesson at Lexington is that the "minute men" were willing to stand there and take it while giving the Brits what for. There are many gages of victory -- willingness to go toe-to-toe with the world's most powerful army -- a well trained and discipline enemy -- is certainly one.

There is a good book about the Revolution -- I forget the title, but something about 19April1775 -- says that the minutemen at Lexington were not supposed to stop the Brits, just fire and withdraw -- similar to a covering force nowadays. The goal in such a mission is to delay the enemy by forcing him to deploy and making him more cautious thereafter.
__________________
Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


"Never pet a burning dog."

RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
http://www.mormon.org
http://www.sca.org
http://www.scv.org/
http://www.scouting.org/
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 28 Apr 04, 12:55
Iron Mike USMC's Avatar
Iron Mike USMC Iron Mike USMC is offline
Brigadier General
United_States
ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Real Name: Ed Brown
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Staten Island, NY
Posts: 2,121
Iron Mike USMC is on the path to success [1-99] Iron Mike USMC is on the path to success [1-99]
Quote:
Originally posted by Janos
The true lesson at Lexington is that the "minute men" were willing to stand there and take it while giving the Brits what for. There are many gages of victory -- willingness to go toe-to-toe with the world's most powerful army -- a well trained and discipline enemy -- is certainly one.

There is a good book about the Revolution -- I forget the title, but something about 19April1775 -- says that the minutemen at Lexington were not supposed to stop the Brits, just fire and withdraw -- similar to a covering force nowadays. The goal in such a mission is to delay the enemy by forcing him to deploy and making him more cautious thereafter.
Could it be "April Morning" by Howard Fast? It dealt specifically with April 19 1775.
__________________
Retreat hell, we just got here. Every Marine, a rifleman.

Never let the facts get in the way of the truth.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01 May 04, 08:45
Janos's Avatar
Janos Janos is offline
General of the Forums
Hungary
Distinguished Service Award ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Real Name: János ispán Vezérőrnagy
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Fredericksburg, Virginia (CSA)
Posts: 14,853
Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700]
Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700]
Unfortunately, I don't remember the name of the book.
__________________
Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


"Never pet a burning dog."

RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
http://www.mormon.org
http://www.sca.org
http://www.scv.org/
http://www.scouting.org/
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 23 Jul 09, 01:45
Paul Burns's Avatar
Paul Burns Paul Burns is offline
Staff Sergeant
Australia
 
Real Name: Paul burns
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sydney
Posts: 159
Paul Burns is on the path to success [1-99]
I'm currently studying Lexington/Concord in depth, in preparation for the next chapter of my book, and am waiting on Galvins's book and French's book to arrive in the mail. Already have Paul rever's Ride and Tourtellot's Lexington and Concord + the diaries of Mackenzie and Barker plus a host of other primary source documents. (I think the book you're talking about might be Allen French's)
I recognise that American ill-feeling among the Patriots/Rebels (I like to call them both so I don't lose perspective) was building rapidly from the Boston Tea Party, and through the various powder scares, and that the Americans were storing arms in case of a possible rising, but, except in the case of some radicals, there doesn't seem to have been a strong desire to break from Britain until some time after Bunker Hill. However, its quite clear the British Light Foot got completely out of control at Lexington, and only the belated arrival of Smith prevented a wholescale massacre of both militia and civilians there (assuming Fischer's reading and Baker's diary are right.) We know that news of what happened at Lexington spread incredibly quickly to all the Massachusetts militias and that they were extremely well-organised for a swift response,, and probably didn't lose anything in the telling. The brutality of the British response at Lexington was probably mostly due to the troops being mostly green. They had never been in battle before. Their officers lost control of them. And it took the experienced Smith some doing to get them under control when he arrived. None of this excuses what was surely a war-time atrocity. Now, the question I am posing is, if Lexington had not been perceived as an atrocity and inferred as such in the Lexington alarm, if in fact the British had acted according to the norms of 18C chivalry, would the militia have responded as it did, along Battle Road, and ultimately, beseiging Boston? (I'm not quite ready to comment on Concord yet) Or would Concord have turned out to be just another powder scare, even taking into account Gage had received instructions from Dartmouth to go hard?

Last edited by Paul Burns; 23 Jul 09 at 01:48..
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 23 Jul 09, 05:37
Janos's Avatar
Janos Janos is offline
General of the Forums
Hungary
Distinguished Service Award ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Real Name: János ispán Vezérőrnagy
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Fredericksburg, Virginia (CSA)
Posts: 14,853
Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700]
Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700] Janos is a glorious beacon of light [700]
You're right -- when the fighting started in 1775, our goal was some form of rights and some degree of home rule. It wasn't for another year that we realized we would never obtain those goals as subjects of the Crown and declared our independence.
__________________
Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


"Never pet a burning dog."

RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
http://www.mormon.org
http://www.sca.org
http://www.scv.org/
http://www.scouting.org/
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 24 Jul 09, 22:01
Gideon's Avatar
Gideon Gideon is offline
First Sergeant
United_States
 
Real Name: Bob
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Montana
Posts: 273
Gideon is on the path to success [1-99] Gideon is on the path to success [1-99]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Burns View Post
I'm currently studying Lexington/Concord in depth, in preparation for the next chapter of my book, and am waiting on Galvins's book and French's book to arrive in the mail. Already have Paul rever's Ride and Tourtellot's Lexington and Concord + the diaries of Mackenzie and Barker plus a host of other primary source documents. (I think the book you're talking about might be Allen French's)
I recognise that American ill-feeling among the Patriots/Rebels (I like to call them both so I don't lose perspective) was building rapidly from the Boston Tea Party, and through the various powder scares, and that the Americans were storing arms in case of a possible rising, but, except in the case of some radicals, there doesn't seem to have been a strong desire to break from Britain until some time after Bunker Hill. However, its quite clear the British Light Foot got completely out of control at Lexington, and only the belated arrival of Smith prevented a wholescale massacre of both militia and civilians there (assuming Fischer's reading and Baker's diary are right.) We know that news of what happened at Lexington spread incredibly quickly to all the Massachusetts militias and that they were extremely well-organised for a swift response,, and probably didn't lose anything in the telling. The brutality of the British response at Lexington was probably mostly due to the troops being mostly green. They had never been in battle before. Their officers lost control of them. And it took the experienced Smith some doing to get them under control when he arrived. None of this excuses what was surely a war-time atrocity. Now, the question I am posing is, if Lexington had not been perceived as an atrocity and inferred as such in the Lexington alarm, if in fact the British had acted according to the norms of 18C chivalry, would the militia have responded as it did, along Battle Road, and ultimately, beseiging Boston? (I'm not quite ready to comment on Concord yet) Or would Concord have turned out to be just another powder scare, even taking into account Gage had received instructions from Dartmouth to go hard?
First Paul, I commend you for reading Tourtellot, a very good book. Second, you are right that at first, except for a few hot-heads, we looked for settlement of the problems without breaking from England. Right up the the Declaration of Independence and beyond there were folks who didn't want the war but reconciliation with England. Thirdly, Smith may have been experienced but did his actions not border on incompetent? Lastly, I submit that ill-feelings were building from around 1761 or at latest 1763. In fact, you can trace the ill-feelings in Rhode Island at least back to the Sugar Act, or the Molasses Act as they liked to call it, of the 1730s. But then Rhode Island is a bit of a special case, a land where smuggling was considered a birthright. There were various rebellions in that state beginning in the mid-1760s, mostly centered around Newport, the center of commerce. These led up to the firing of the Gaspee 9 June, 1772 and the wounding of its dastardly commander, Lt. Dudingston. Many consider the sinking of the HMS Gaspee the opening act of the war. Shortly after that, Capt. Abraham Whipple got into the first naval battle of the war, before the "war" was on, on open water and fired on and captured a British ship, as I recollect the tender to HMS Rose, 8 guns, Capt. Wallace. So the war crept up on us for a long time, although Lexington was probably the spark that really galvanized the colonies.
__________________
"We fight, get beat, rise and fight again." Gen. Nathanael Greene
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links

  #11  
Old 24 Jul 09, 22:11
Gideon's Avatar
Gideon Gideon is offline
First Sergeant
United_States
 
Real Name: Bob
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Montana
Posts: 273
Gideon is on the path to success [1-99] Gideon is on the path to success [1-99]
Guess I forgot to answer the question you posed. Hard to say for sure how the militia would have acted, but given just a little instigation, like a shot from anywhere, they may have acted just the same. They were relatively raw as well and ill feelings had been building for years. There was a long list of British atrocities that probably ate away at them. They had motive, means, and opportunity and were itching for a fight. The time was right and in my opinion if a British sergeant had looked cross-eyed at one of them he might have touched off the whole mess. Just my opinion.
__________________
"We fight, get beat, rise and fight again." Gen. Nathanael Greene
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 24 Jul 09, 22:48
Paul Burns's Avatar
Paul Burns Paul Burns is offline
Staff Sergeant
Australia
 
Real Name: Paul burns
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sydney
Posts: 159
Paul Burns is on the path to success [1-99]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gideon View Post


First Paul, I commend you for reading Tourtellot, a very good book. Second, you are right that at first, except for a few hot-heads, we looked for settlement of the problems without breaking from England. Right up the the Declaration of Independence and beyond there were folks who didn't want the war but reconciliation with England. Thirdly, Smith may have been experienced but did his actions not border on incompetent? Lastly, I submit that ill-feelings were building from around 1761 or at latest 1763. In fact, you can trace the ill-feelings in Rhode Island at least back to the Sugar Act, or the Molasses Act as they liked to call it, of the 1730s. But then Rhode Island is a bit of a special case, a land where smuggling was considered a birthright. There were various rebellions in that state beginning in the mid-1760s, mostly centered around Newport, the center of commerce. These led up to the firing of the Gaspee 9 June, 1772 and the wounding of its dastardly commander, Lt. Dudingston. Many consider the sinking of the HMS Gaspee the opening act of the war. Shortly after that, Capt. Abraham Whipple got into the first naval battle of the war, before the "war" was on, on open water and fired on and captured a British ship, as I recollect the tender to HMS Rose, 8 guns, Capt. Wallace. So the war crept up on us for a long time, although Lexington was probably the spark that really galvanized the colonies.
Hi, Gideon.
I agree Smith was incompetent in his early organisation of the Concord expedition, especially at the beginning, though I tend to think it was the obvious nature of naval preparations by Admiral Graves in the two days before the expedition that gave the game away. However, the long delay in the Cambridge Marshes waiting for naval rations that weren't needed, after the badly organised crossing of, I think, the Charles River (which was Graves's fault) and the consequent need for forced marches in a desperate attempt to get to Concord unseen by the Provincials, were the measures of Smith's incompetence. Smith had sent ahead one experienced officer, Pitcairn, with the advance party that got itself stupidly caught up in the Lexington fire-fight, and, so, could have reasonably expected such an event would not have happened. Only his arrival at Lexington with the grenadiers and the rest of the light infantry prevented a full-scale massacre. (Things were much better conducted in the first two hours at Concord.)
I take your point about the Gaspee and Whipple/Rose incidents. However, I tend to see these as glitches in the 1770-1773 "Period of Quiet". As I read it, Sam Adams had to seize on the Tea Act to manufacture a revolutionary situation, because reconciliation was too much in the air. His opportunities were slipping away from him.
Re Rhode Island smuggling, versus smuggling elsewhere, it seems to me, after an initial complaint, the Royal Navy's policing of smuggling was sullenly accepted. The RIers were a special case, and one of those most adversely effected in the crack down on the molasses trade. Their reaction does not seem to compare, after 1770, and that's an important qualification, with the seething tolerance of naval/customs policing etc, that probably ends about the time of the establishment of intercolonial committees of correspondence, (admittedly in part prompted by the Gaspee enquiry.) Its those committees of correspondence that I would describe as the first true 'revolutionary" piece of organisation. (Compare similar in the French Revolution and the London Corresponding Societies suppressed by Pitt the Younger during the French Revolutionary/Napoleonic Wars.)
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 25 Jul 09, 09:29
Gideon's Avatar
Gideon Gideon is offline
First Sergeant
United_States
 
Real Name: Bob
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Montana
Posts: 273
Gideon is on the path to success [1-99] Gideon is on the path to success [1-99]
I cannot imagine how Graves,et al expected to get out of the marshes and on their way without being noticed. That is incomprehensible. I believe reinforcements got on to Lexington almost in spite of Smith, but I probably should not malign the man too much. I do not believe the Gaspee affair was a glitch in the 1770-1773 "quiet" period but rather the culmination of the mounting tensions in RI from 1761 (or 1730s) to 1772. Sam Adams wanted not to pick the fruit until they were fully ripe, so to speak, and so waited a bit longer to let it all go at the Tea Party. But the Gaspee certainly ratcheted up the colonial tension as a prelude to the Tea Party. While RIanders were rioting in the 1760s, and even burned some of the longboats from the Squirrel (I believe) in Newport, those riots were rather disorganized and spur-of-the-moment affairs it seems. They had no master manipulator like Sam Adams. Origanization of the Committees of Safety, Committees of Correspondance, etc. would seem to be some of the first organized, coordinated plans. I enjoy your posts, Paul.
__________________
"We fight, get beat, rise and fight again." Gen. Nathanael Greene

Last edited by Gideon; 25 Jul 09 at 09:33..
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 25 Jul 09, 21:57
Paul Burns's Avatar
Paul Burns Paul Burns is offline
Staff Sergeant
Australia
 
Real Name: Paul burns
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sydney
Posts: 159
Paul Burns is on the path to success [1-99]
Hi, Gideon.
I've just written up the Squirrel incident in the second chapter of my book. (William George Maxwell, later a lieutenant in NSW, was a nine year old captain's servant on the Squirrel.) The fuss was initially about protests against the press gang, but then the St John cutter intercepted an American smuggler and it turned into a standoff between the St. John and the smuggler, the Basto after a dispute about the St. John sailors stealing some chickens and pigs. A boatload of Rhode Islanders tried to board the St. John but thought better of it. The ceremonial gunner on ST George island was instructed by thr Newport Governing Council to sink the St. John, now under the protection of the Squirrel's guns, if she attempted to leave port without giving up the thieves. The gunner was smart enough to shoot wide, and thus avoided starting the American Revolution in 1764.
Neil R. Stout (who I have roughly followed here) gives a good account of the incident in his The Royal Navy in Amerca, 1760-1775.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 25 Jul 09, 22:15
Paul Burns's Avatar
Paul Burns Paul Burns is offline
Staff Sergeant
Australia
 
Real Name: Paul burns
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sydney
Posts: 159
Paul Burns is on the path to success [1-99]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gideon View Post
I cannot imagine how Graves,et al expected to get out of the marshes and on their way without being noticed. That is incomprehensible. I believe reinforcements got on to Lexington almost in spite of Smith, but I probably should not malign the man too much. I do not believe the Gaspee affair was a glitch in the 1770-1773 "quiet" period but rather the culmination of the mounting tensions in RI from 1761 (or 1730s) to 1772. Sam Adams wanted not to pick the fruit until they were fully ripe, so to speak, and so waited a bit longer to let it all go at the Tea Party. But the Gaspee certainly ratcheted up the colonial tension as a prelude to the Tea Party. While RIanders were rioting in the 1760s, and even burned some of the longboats from the Squirrel (I believe) in Newport, those riots were rather disorganized and spur-of-the-moment affairs it seems. They had no master manipulator like Sam Adams. Origanization of the Committees of Safety, Committees of Correspondance, etc. would seem to be some of the first organized, coordinated plans. I enjoy your posts, Paul.
Hi Gideon.
as I understand it, Smith's forces met no opposition before Lexington, though by then the British had heard the alarms, seen the beacons, and received the alarming news that Paul Revere had been abroad, and had been caught and released. If I have it right, even on the way to Concord, they met one lone milita-man who was easily disarmed, and the young mitiamen under Hosmer who had come out from Concord backed off when they saw the size of the British expedition.
I recognise there is an interesting debate over the "quiet period'. One American historian I've read even suggests there was no such thing. Can't give you a reference unfortunately; I've read so many histories on the lead up to the war recently, threy've all melded one into the other, and it would take too long to find it in my notes.
I'll take your point about the significance of the Gaspee affair. I've read about it, of course, but have not studied it in detail as none of my blokes were involved in it.
I enjoy the discussions we get going, too, Gideon. As you can imagine, working as an independent historian on the American Revolution in Australia, and not being employed by a uni, I don't have that many people to throw ideas around with. So this is a bit of a bonus for me.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Please bookmark this thread if you enjoyed it!


Thread Tools
Display Modes



Forum Jump

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:17.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.