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  #76  
Old 25 May 14, 10:54
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Below is a link to a post which discusses my grandmother's mother, Margaret Daly Kelly, at some length.

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...et#post2816647
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  #77  
Old 16 Aug 14, 09:15
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Link to "The Islander" the weekly paper of the Lake Champlain Islands area. Page 11 has a short story about Camp Ingalls which I have written about, up the street from the family farm/my grandparent's place, which used to be a 4H camp.

http://lakechamplainislander.com/ass...nder081214.pdf
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  #78  
Old 01 Nov 14, 11:07
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A you tube video of the Grand Isle ferry - this trip from Plattsburgh, NY to Grand Isle, VT. We could see it from the shore on a clear day, certainly when out on a boat. About five from the left of the boat as it lands in VT (to the North) There is a state fish hatchery nearby the Vermont dock.

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Old 03 Nov 14, 07:28
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Your running a great thread Tony. A nice place to stop in and just enjoy the quite of America.
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Old 19 Jul 15, 10:09
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Story about a modern dairy farm in Vermont

Story about a modern day dairy farm partially closing in Hartford,VT. Interesting info about the current business. From The Valley News.

One thing I found interesting was the average size of the dairy farms in Vermont - about 200 cows - the farmer in the story had about 94 for milk. He is keeping some for cheese production, and he will still grow hay and corn and produce maple syrup.

http://www.vnews.com/news/newsletter...m-of-milk-glut

excerpt

The primary motivation for his decision was the recent dip in milk prices, he said. Following a high last year of around $24 per hundredweight — 100 pounds of milk, or a little more than 11 gallons — prices paid to farmers have dropped to around $17 per hundredweight, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
The work of feeding, milking and cleaning up after the cows felt worth it when Miller could earn a “fair price” for his product, but not when the income he earns is insufficient to cover his costs, which include grain, fertilizer, equipment maintenance and replacement and labor.
The nationwide decline in milk prices is in part driven by the end of a drought in Australia and New Zealand that had previously kept milk from that part of the world out of the export market, said Barnard dairy farmer Paul Doton, who sits on the board of the Agri-Mark dairy cooperative, of which Miller is also a member.
Additional factors include declines in the amount of U.S. milk being exported to China and Russia not accepting milk from the U.S., Doton said.
Helping to buffer the price drop here is the severe drought in the western part of the country, slowing milk production in California, he said.
“It’s a big mess,” he said. “Without them going down, the price would have gone down more.”
Challenges specific to New England include a glut of milk on the market because two New York yogurt plants are accepting less milk than anticipated, Doton said. For example, Chobani, a manufacturer of Greek yogurt, which has a plant in New York state, recently opened a new plant in Idaho because it found it could make its product for less there. As a result, Chobani’s demand for milk in the Northeast has declined, he said.
In general, Doton said there are fewer processing plants in the region than there once were because milk is cheaper elsewhere. One challenge for farmers in the Northeast is the cost of grain. He said farmers in this region have to pay for the cost of shipping the grain to them.
“We say (milk from other regions is) not such high quality, but that doesn’t cut it,” he said.

Last edited by lakechampainer; 19 Jul 15 at 10:18..
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  #81  
Old 19 Jun 16, 13:00
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I was talking to my sister today. She and my brother-in-law just returned from camping in New Hampshire. In the middle of a forest, they saw an old, nice-looking chimney which was essentially all that was left of an old house. This reminded her of the times our mother showed us in the woods near the farm the old, hard-to-locate in the 1970's cottage that her grandparents had lived in about 1887 (NOTE: I discussed this on post 5). My sister told me something I didn't know or at least forgot, that my mother's grandmother's mother (who kept my mother alive when she was born) previously lived in this cottage. My great-great grandmother's name was Azelia (Chagnon/Shawyea) Poquette. This is noted in 1.8.7 of the following attachment.

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vt...ce/dubuque.htm

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  #82  
Old 19 Jun 16, 13:36
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In the video below, they are boating around North Hero, starting at 10:50

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  #83  
Old 21 Jul 16, 08:54
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A report on the geology of Vermont from 1923-1924. Has sections on Grand Isle County and North Hero.

http://dec.vermont.gov/sites/dec/fil...erkins1924.pdf

Excerpt from page 38 of the PDF

ng north from Grand isle one comes to North Hero.
NORTH HERO.
The only beds found on this island are those of the Lpper
Trenton and they are very much like those seen over the northern
part of Grand Isle. Though for the most part the rocks of this
island do not yield any distinct fossils, vet there are a few localities
much richer than similar beds on the southern island.
At Hazen Point, and some rods north on the west shore and
1-libbard Point on the east shore, fossils may be found, but there
are only a few sliecies as Triarthrus, a few Graptolites, etc. ( see
Ruedemann's list following). The Graptolites seem to be more
abundant and more widely (listributed than other fossils in these
rocks.
In passing it may be noticed that the surface of North Hero
is low and, except along the shores, more or less covered by drift.
Nowhere is the land more than sixty feet above the lake and in
only a few places as much as this. Because of the soft and friable
nature of most of its rock, the shores of this island are very
irregular and greatly eroded by the waves of the lake.
The change from lower rock easily broken by the hammer
to that higher up, almost or quite to the surface, is very gradual
and in many places the eye cannot find any division. The strata
have in most places been very little disturbed and the upper clays,
formed by the decomposed shale, though soft and easily shovelled,
plainly sho\v the original layers. Still in a few places there is
considerable upheaval and the entire thickness, which has not
been carefully measured, must be several hundred feet. The
otitcrops of the shale on North Hero are taken tip in some (leta
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  #84  
Old 12 Aug 16, 19:25
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Re for example thumbnail #1 on post 6, which shows my great-grandfather with a two horse team pulling an implement of some type. Maybe a plow, which is what I thought originally, but not sure after researching old pictures. Not a hay rake, wheels here are to small. Maybe the device here is to make furrows - small trenches for seeds for the vegetable garden. My best guess is the picture is from about 1930. (My great-grandfather would have been 64).

Regarding the horses, they look too sturdy to me to be Morgan horses, based upon comparing them to images on the internet. However, multiple sources refer to Morgan horses as being the workhouses on Vermont farms in the early 20th century.

Anyway, interesting pictures from this link from early 20th century, from campsilos.org. Pictures from Iowa apparently.

http://www.campsilos.org/excursions/hc/three/s1d.htm

excerpt

At the turn of the century horses were the most important animals on the farm. They provided the power that pulled most of the heavy farm machinery. Plows, corn pickers, hay rakes, wagons, buggies-they pulled them all. Usually horses worked in teams of two. Farmers often gave them names like King and Queen or Old Bob and Ladybug. The seasons controlled the farm work. There were certain jobs that had to be done in each season.

Last edited by lakechampainer; 12 Aug 16 at 20:22..
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Old 12 Aug 16, 20:10
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From The Vermont Historical Society Community History Project - about farming in Westfield, VT in the 20th Century. Westfield is about 50 miles east of North Hero, as a bird flies.

Based on the description below, perhaps the picture in post six is of a "grain drill"


http://www.vhscommunityhistory.org/p...s/farming.html

excerpt

During the early years of farming some of the tools that were used were grain drills. These were used for sowing wheat, oats, barley, corn, beans, and peas… The price range was based on how many "teeth'' that the drill had. $80 for nine teeth, $70 for seven teeth. Tools cost a lot more now then they did when farms were more popular. Another tool that was used was called a hand- held corn Sheller. You would stick the corncob into the machine, crank the handle, and the seeds would fall out of the hole on the other side.

Some of the jobs that you would have on the farm would be milking the cows and feeding the horses. You would be up from 5:00am- 8:00pm. Other jobs that had to be done on a farm were: harvesting the fields. The fields were harvested by using a horse drawn plow. Another job was grounding feed, and thrashing the corn to get it ready to be put into bags.

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  #86  
Old 13 Aug 16, 05:33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakechampainer View Post
Re for example thumbnail #1 on post 6, which shows my great-grandfather with a two horse team pulling an implement of some type. Maybe a plow, which is what I thought originally, but not sure after researching old pictures. Not a hay rake, wheels here are to small. Maybe the device here is to make furrows - small trenches for seeds for the vegetable garden. My best guess is the picture is from about 1930. (My great-grandfather would have been 64).

Regarding the horses, they look too sturdy to me to be Morgan horses, based upon comparing them to images on the internet. However, multiple sources refer to Morgan horses as being the workhouses on Vermont farms in the early 20th century.

Anyway, interesting pictures from this link from early 20th century, from campsilos.org. Pictures from Iowa apparently.

http://www.campsilos.org/excursions/hc/three/s1d.htm

excerpt

At the turn of the century horses were the most important animals on the farm. They provided the power that pulled most of the heavy farm machinery. Plows, corn pickers, hay rakes, wagons, buggies-they pulled them all. Usually horses worked in teams of two. Farmers often gave them names like King and Queen or Old Bob and Ladybug. The seasons controlled the farm work. There were certain jobs that had to be done in each season.
I took a look at those two pic's. I have the slightest idea of what it was used for.

Do you have a farm museum up there that you could send a copy to?
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Old 13 Aug 16, 09:39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Half Pint John View Post
I took a look at those two pic's. I have the slightest idea of what it was used for.

Do you have a farm museum up there that you could send a copy to?
That's a good thought, John. There are several options I will look into - the local county agricultural society runs the fall fair around here (The Topsfield Fair) and has an exhibit of old farm implements, etc. in the old Grange building. I can probably ask some of the knowledgeable people involved in the group.

Thanks

edit - looking at the picture again, it appears to be weeds, etc. in the field, which I know was used for garden crops, etc. So it hasn't been plowed yet. So presumably it is say May and the implement is a plow.

Of course who ever took the picture was not taking a picture of the farm implement -I would say they were taking a picture of the horses.

Last edited by lakechampainer; 13 Aug 16 at 09:46..
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Old 13 Aug 16, 10:21
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I have been reading the posts on this thread with great appreciation and anticipation. It is a snap shot into what life was like for most Americans just a century ago. My family shared this same life style having come west on the Oregon Trail late in the 1800s to find a new start in Oregon settling in the South Coastal mountains near Gravel Ford where they operated dairies and egg farms.
Reading the posts brings back memories of sitting with my grandparents and hearing their stories about those days, they were both born in the 1800s. Carl in 1881 Emma in 1894. They moved to the east county of San Diego in the 1920s following a epidemic of TB that swept through the area they lived in Oregon, Emma spent two years in a isolation ward having come down with TB, they didn't have the medicines we now take for granted, the doctors told Carl he had to find a dry climate for Emma, so he followed his parents to San Diego County, they had moved there in 1917.
My dad was born in '24, the last generation to grow up on a homestead style ranch three miles north of the Mexican border on a cattle ranch. By the time I was born in '50, Carl had sold off all but 180 acres of the 1,900 he once owned.
I spent every summer with Carl and Emma helping out on the little operation, mostly substance farming, selling eggs and baked goods Emma made at a small country store in Campo.
When I was 12 I watched Carl die as my father and medics tried to revive him, he was 82 and suffering from the damage done from years of tobacco use. Emma slow faded into her our mind becoming almost childlike, we took her off the ranch in 1966.
She passed in 1971. There isn't a day that goes by that I don't think of them and the life they lived, so uncomplicated by today's standard. It was a hard life, but they had what they needed and never owed a dime to anyone.
We could all take a lesson from that generation, what my dad called the last pioneers.
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Old 13 Aug 16, 10:34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban hermit View Post
I have been reading the posts on this thread with great appreciation and anticipation. It is a snap shot into what life was like for most Americans just a century ago. My family shared this same life style having come west on the Oregon Trail late in the 1800s to find a new start in Oregon settling in the South Coastal mountains near Gravel Ford where they operated dairies and egg farms.
Reading the posts brings back memories of sitting with my grandparents and hearing their stories about those days, they were both born in the 1800s. Carl in 1881 Emma in 1894. They moved to the east county of San Diego in the 1920s following a epidemic of TB that swept through the area they lived in Oregon, Emma spent two years in a isolation ward having come down with TB, they didn't have the medicines we now take for granted, the doctors told Carl he had to find a dry climate for Emma, so he followed his parents to San Diego County, they had moved there in 1917.
My dad was born in '24, the last generation to grow up on a homestead style ranch three miles north of the Mexican border on a cattle ranch. By the time I was born in '50, Carl had sold off all but 180 acres of the 1,900 he once owned.
I spent every summer with Carl and Emma helping out on the little operation, mostly substance farming, selling eggs and baked goods Emma made at a small country store in Campo.
When I was 12 I watched Carl die as my father and medics tried to revive him, he was 82 and suffering from the damage done from years of tobacco use. Emma slow faded into her our mind becoming almost childlike, we took her off the ranch in 1966.
She passed in 1971. There isn't a day that goes by that I don't think of them and the life they lived, so uncomplicated by today's standard. It was a hard life, but they had what they needed and never owed a dime to anyone.
We could all take a lesson from that generation, what my dad called the last pioneers.
Thanks for the great post, Urban hermit! Very interesting - we do take for granted modern medicine, including antibiotics. When my mother was about 11 she had scarlet fever and had to stay in a "sanatorium"? for a month or so (In Boston, not in Vermont).


Do you have any pictures from your childhood or your parents?
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Old 13 Aug 16, 11:21
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lakechampainer is simply cracking [600]
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An article I just found about a woman who raises Morgan horses in North Hero. Her name is Sherry Siebenaler. The article is from "The Herald", on February 16, 2012.


http://www.ourherald.com/news/2012-0...Vermonts_.html

excerpt

Her parents started dairying in the 1960s in North Hero and she helped out with her brother and sister raising chickens, Shetland ponies, and goats. “I grew up on the farm, so it was always in my blood,” she says.

Selling the Farm

But in the late 1970s, the farm busi*ness started to go south. Walking into the clean, long Quonset-roofed barn, her voice takes on a hint of bitterness as she points to the two concrete bases where blue silos once stood. The cost of building them helped squeeze the farm out of business, she says.

“When the place went through bank*ruptcy, I watched how it literally tore the family apart,” she says. “I told my mother I’d like to try and save it, and she told me I couldn’t do it, because I was a woman, and that gave me the kick in the butt to do it.”

It must have been a heck of a kick. Working a second job driving a bus in Burlington, which she does to this day, she saved and bought back 40 acres and a “rickety mobile home.”

Then she bought the remaining acres, no small feat in this pastoral summer tourist idyll, where tiny house parcels litter what were once farm fields, reflecting the ascendance of lake recreation over agriculture. Her parents jokingly – and admiringly as well – now call her the “land baron.”

“My mother is totally blown away,” she says.

Getting back the family farm, whose spacious fields are ringed by small cot*tages and homes, gave her a place to raise her Morgans (she has 16 now.) But that was only a first step.

Her Own Path

Giving up an apprenticeship at the University of Vermont Morgan Horse farm in Weybridge, she forged her own educational path and a career track that reflects her passion for preserving vanishing heritage bloodlines.

Today, vets come to her to learn about “flushing embryos,” “vitrifying tanks” and “semen straws” in liquid ni*trogen storage.

“My goal in life – not that anybody else will ever care – is to preserve the original Morgan horse like they used to be,” she says.

A Morgan Obsession

Vermont’s famed horse evolved in three bloodlines, whose story Siebena*ler can relate at length, involving the government and Lippitt lines and one tied to horseman J.C. Brunk. The long and short of it – and size plays a big role in her genetic interest – was that she could not “find the Morgan horse I grew up with.”

That would be a well-built horse smaller of stature, very people-orient*ed, one you can “work ‘em all day, drive ‘em all day, then take them to the horse show… they don’t care,” she says.

That’s what she has now in the hand*some black stallion and bays and chest*nut horses that roam the paddocks and training ring at Morgan Hill Farm, calmly looking on in their shaggy win*ter coats as she goes by.

Her genetic interests also brought her to breeding the stocky AKC Eng*lish Labs. They’re smaller and more mellow than their American cousins – she jokingly calls them “Lapadors” be*cause they think they’re small enough to crawl on your lap.

Pups from her litters are always spoken for.

--------------------------------------------------

Morgan Hill Farm's website.

http://www.stallionstation.com/scmorgans/

Last edited by lakechampainer; 13 Aug 16 at 11:31..
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