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  #46  
Old 29 Nov 10, 23:44
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Bement, Piatt Co. Ill.

July 30th, 1858

Dear Sir:

Your letter, dated yesterday, accepting my proposition for a joint discussion at one prominent point in each Congressional district as stated in my previous letter was received this morning.

The times and places designated are as follows:

Ottowa [Ottawa], ... LaSalle Co, ... August ... 21st ... 1858

Freeport, ... Stevenson Co. ... " ... 27th ... "

Jonesboro', ... Union Co. ... September ... 15 " ... "

Charleston, ... Coles Co. ... " ... 18 " ... "

Galesburg, ... Knox Co. ... October ... 7 " ... "

Quincy, ... Adams Co. ... " ... 13 " ... "

Alton, ... Madison Co. ... " ... 15 " ... "

I agree to your suggestion that we shall alternately open and close the discussion. I will speak at Ottowa one hour, you can reply, occupying an hour and a half, and I will then follow for half an hour. At Freeport you shall open the discussion and speak one hour, I will follow for an hour and a half and you can then reply for half an hour. We will alternate in like manner at each successive place.

Very resp'y,

Y'r ob't serv't,

S. A. Douglas

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Old 29 Nov 10, 23:49
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Commander of the 5th Division of the Army of the Tennessee to a Tennessee Slaveholder

Memphis Tenn. Aug 24th 1862

My dear Sir, I freely admit that when you recall the times when we were schoolfellows, when we were younger than now, you touch me on a tender point, and cause me to deeply regret that even you should style yourself a Rebel. I cannot believe that Tom Hunton the Companion of Gaither, Rankin, and Irvin and many others long since dead, and of Halleck. Ord, Stevens and others still living can of his own free will admit the anarchical principle of secession or be vain enough to suppose the present Politicions Can frame a Government better than that of Washington Hamilton & Jefferson. We cannot realize this but delude ourselves into the belief that by some strange but successful jugglery the manegers of our Political Machine have raised up the single issue, North or South, which shall prevail in America? or that you like others have been blown up, and cast into the Mississippi of Secession doubtful if by hard fighting you can reach the shore in safety, or drift out to the Ocean of Death, I know it is no use for us now to discuss this–war is on us. We are Enemies, still private friends. In the one Capacity I will do you all the harm I can, yet on the other if here. you may have as of old my last Cent, my last shirt and pants, You ask of me your negroes. and I will immediately ascertain if they be under my Military Control and I will moreover see that they are one and all told what is true of all– Boys if you want to go to your master, Go– You are free to choose, You must now think for yourselves. Your Master has seceded from his Parent Government and you have seceded from him–both wrong by law–but bothe exercising an undoubted natural Right to rebel, If your boys want to go, I will enable them to go, but I wont advise, persuade or force them– I confess I have not yet seen the “Confiscation Act,” but I enclose you my own orders defining my position, I also cut out of a paper Grant's Orders, and I assert that the Action of all our Leading Military Leaders, Halleck, McClellan, Buell, Grant & myself have been more conservative of slavery than the Acts of your own men. The Constitution of the United States is your only legal title to slavery. You have another title, that of posession & Force, but in Law & Logic your title to your Boys lay in the Constitution of the United States. You may say you are for the Constitution of the United States, as it was– You know it is unchanged, not a word not a syllable and I can lay my hand on that Constitution and swear to it without one twang. But your party have made another and have another in force How can you say that you would have the old, when you have a new By the new if sucessful you inherit the Right of Slavery, but the new is not law till your Revolution is successful. Therefore we who contend for the old existing Law, Contend that you by your own act take away Your own title to all property save what is restricted by our constitution, your slaves included. You know I don't want your slaves; but to bring you to reason I think as a Military Man I have a Right and it is good policy to make you all feel that you are but men–that you have all the wants & dependencies of other men, and must eat, be clad &c to which end you must have property & labor, and that by Rebelling you risk both, Even without the Confiscation Act, by the simple laws of War we ought to take your effective slaves. I don't say to free them, but to use their labor & deprive you of it; as Belligerents we ought to seek the hostile Army and fight it and not the people.– We went to Corinth but Beaureguard declined Battle, since which time many are dispersed as Guerillas. We are not bound to follow them, but rightfully make war by any means that will tend to bring about an end and restore Peace. Your people may say it only exasperates, widens the breach and all that, But the longer the war lasts the more you must be convinced that we are no better & no worse than People who have gone before us, and that we are simply reenacting History, and that one of the modes of bringing People to reason is to touch their Interests pecuniary or property.

We never harbor women or children–we give employment to men, under the enclosed order. I find no negroes Registered as belonging to Hunton, some in the name of McGhee of which the Engineer is now making a list– I see McClellan says that the negroes once taken shall never again be restored.1 I say nothing. My opinion is, we execute not make the Law, be it of Congress or War. But it is Manifest that if you wont go into a United States District Court and sue for the recovery of your slave property You can never Get it, out of adverse hands. No U.S. Court would allow you to sue for the recovery of a slave under the Fugitive Slave Law. unless you acknowledge allegiance. Believing this honesty, so I must act. though personally I feel strong frindship as ever, for very many in the South With Great Respect Your friend

W. T. Sherman
Maj. Genl. W. T. Sherman to Thomas Hunton, Esq., 24 Aug. 1862, vol. 3, pp. 51–53, Letters Sent, W. T. Sherman Papers, Generals' Papers & Books, ser. 159, Adjutant General's Office, Record Group 94, National Archives.

1. On August 9, 1862, General George B. McClellan, commander of the Army of the Potomac, issued an order promulgating President Abraham Lincoln's executive order of July 22, which had instructed the federal armies operating in rebellious states to seize property suitable for military purposes and to employ slaves. McClellan added that slaves employed by the Union army “have always understood that after being received into the military service of the United States in any capacity they could never be reclaimed by their former holders,” and he promised such slaves “permanent military protection against any compulsory return to a condition of servitude.” (The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, ser. 1, vol. 11, pt. 3, pp. 362–64.)
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Old 29 Nov 10, 23:50
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Maryland Slave to the President

Belair [Md.] Aug 25th 1864

Mr president It is my Desire to be free. to go to see my people on the eastern shore. my mistress wont let me you will please let me know if we are free. and what i can do. I write to you for advice. please send me word this week. or as soon as possible and oblidge.

Annie Davis
Annie Davis to Mr. president, 25 Aug. 1864, D-304 1864, Letters Received, ser. 360, Colored Troops Division, Adjutant General's Office, Record Group 94, National Archives. A Bureau of Colored Troops notation on the outside of the letter reads merely “file,” and no response to Annie Davis appears among the copies of letters sent by the bureau or by other offices in the War Department.
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Old 30 Nov 10, 02:02
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Robert - you she see if they can make this a sticky.
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Old 30 Nov 10, 09:43
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For those of you interested in Jeff Davis- here are some of his select communications;

RICHMOND, VA., November 3, 1861.

GENERAL J. E. JOHNSTON, Commanding Department of the Potomac.

SIR : Reports have been and are being widely circulated to the effect that I prevented General Beauregard from pursuing the enemy after the battle of Manassas, and had subsequently restrained him from advancing up on Washington City. Though such statements may have been made merely for my injury, and in that view might be postponed to a more convenient season, they have acquired importance from the fact that they have served to create distrust, to excite disappointment, and must embarrass the administration in its further efforts to reinforce the armies of the Potomac, and generally to provide for the public defence. For these public considerations I call upon you, as the commanding general, and as a party to all the conferences held by me on July 21st and 22d, to say whether I obstructed the pursuit of the enemy after the victory of Manassas, or have ever objected to an advance or other active operation which it was feasible for the army to undertake.

Very respectfully yours, etc.,

JEFFERSON DAVIS

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

RICHMOND, VA., November 10th, 1861.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD :

Sir, When I addressed you in relation to your complaint because of the letters written to you by Mr. Benjamin, Acting Secretary of War, it was hoped that you would see that you had misrepresented his expressions, and would be content.

*********

I do not feel competent to instruct Mr. Benjamin in the matter of style; there are few whom the public would, probably, believe fit for that task. But the other point quoted from your letter presents matters for graver consideration, and it is that which induces me to reply. It cannot be peculiar to Mr. Benjamin to look at every exercise of official power in its legal aspect, and you surely did not intend to inform me that your army and yourself are outside of the limits of the law.

It is my duty to see that the laws are faithfully executed, and I cannot recognize the pretension of any one that their restraint is too narrow for him.

*********

Very respectfully,

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

RICHMOND, VA., March 15, 1862.

GENERAL J. E. JOHNSTON,

Culpepper Court-House, Va.

Your letter of the 13th received this day, being the first information of your retrograde movement. I have no report of your reconnaissance, and can suggest nothing as to the position you should take, except it should be as far in advance as consistent with your safety.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

RICHMOND, VA., March 15, 1862.

GENERAL J. E. JOHNSTON,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL : I have received your letter of the 13th instant, giving the first official account I have received of the retrograde movement of your army.

Your letter would lead me to infer that others had been sent to apprise me of your plans and movements. If so, they have not reached me ; and before the receipt of yours of the 13th I was as much in the dark as to your purposes, condition, and necessities, as at the time of our conversation on the subject about a month since.

It is true I have had many and alarming reports of great destruction of ammunition, camp equipage, and provisions, indicating precipitate retreat ; but having heard of no cause for such a sudden movement I was at a loss to believe it.

I have not the requisite topographical knowledge for the selection of your position. I had intended that you should determine that question ; and for this purpose a corps of engineers was furnished to make a careful examination of the country to aid you in your decision.

The question of throwing troops into Richmond is contingent upon reverses in the West and Southeast. The immediate necessity for such a movement is not anticipated.

Very respectfully yours,

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

RICHMOND, VA., May 1, 1862.

GENERAL J. E. JOHNSTON, Yorktown, Va.

Accepting your conclusion that you must soon retire, arrangements are commenced for the abandonment of the Navy Yard and removal of public property both from Norfolk and the Peninsula.

Your announcement to-day that you would withdraw to-morrow night, takes us by surprise, and must involve enormous losses, including unfinished gunboats. Will the safety of your army allow more time ?

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

RICHMOND, June 20th, 1862.

General BRAXTON BRAGG, Tupelo, Mississippi :

Your despatch, informing me that General Beauregard had turned over the command to you and left for Mobile, on surgeons' certificate, was duly received. You are assigned permanently to the command of the department, as will be more formally notified to you by the Secretary of War. You will correspond directly, and receive orders and instructions from the government in relation to your future operations.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>


RICHMOND, August 1, 1862.

SIR : On June 29th last, you were instructed by the Secretary of War to make inquiries of the General in command of the United States forces, relative to alleged murders committed on our citizens by officers of the United States army, and the case of William B. Mumford, reported to have been murdered at New Orleans by order of MajorGeneral B. F. Butler, and Colonel John Owen, reported to have been murdered in the same manner in Missouri, by order of Major-General Pope, were specially referred to.

The inquiries thus made by you of Major-General McClellan were referred by that officer to his Government for reply, but no answer has yet been received.

We have since been credibly informed that numerous other officers of the armies of the United States have, within the Confederacy, been guilty of felonies and capital offences which are punishable by all law human and divine. A few of those best authenticated are brought to your notice.

The newspapers received from the enemy's country announce as a fact that Major-General Hunter has armed slaves for the murder of their masters, and has thus done all in his power to inaugurate a servile war which is worse than that of the savage, inasmuch as it superadds other horrors to the indiscriminate slaughter of all ages, sexes, and conditions.

Brigadier-General Phelps is reported to have imitated at New Orleans the example set by General Hunter on the coast of South Carolina.

Brigadier- General G. N. Fitch is stated in the same journals to have murdered in cold blood two peaceful citizens, because one of his men, while invading 1 our country, was killed by some unknown person defending his home.

You are now instructed to repeat your inquiry relative to the cases of Mumford and Owen, and further to ask of the Commanding General of the enemy whether the statements in relation to the action of Generals Hunter, Phelps, and Fitch are admitted to be true, and whether the conduct of those Generals is sanctioned by their Government.

You will further give notice that, in the event of our failure to receive a reply to these inquiries within fifteen days from the delivery of your letter, we shall assume that the alleged facts are true and are sanctioned by the Government of the United States.

In such event, on that Government will rest the responsibility of the retributive or retaliatory measures which we shall adopt to put an end to the merciless atrocities which now characterize the war waged against us.

Very respectfully yours, etc.,

(Signed) JEFFERSON DAVIS.

GENERAL R. E. LEE, Commanding, etc.
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Old 30 Nov 10, 10:02
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One of my favorites- Davis obliterates all of the excuses Johnston gives for doing nothing at Vicksburg.

RICHMOND, July 15, 1863.

GENERAL J. E. JOHNSTON, Commanding, etc.

GENERAL: Your despatch of the 5th instant stating that you ' considered ' your ' assignment to the immediate command in Mississippi ' as giving you ' a new position ' and as ' limiting your authority/ being a repetition of a statement which you were informed was a grave error, and being persisted in after your failure to point out, when requested, the letter or despatch justifying you in such a conclusion, rendered it necessary, as you were informed in my despatch of the 8th instant, that I should make a more extended reply than could be given in a telegram. That there may be no possible room for further mistake in this matter, I am compelled to recapitulate the substance of all orders and instructions given to you, so far as they bear on this question.

On November 24th last you were assigned, by Special Order No. 275, to a defined geographical command. The description included a portion of Western North Carolina and Northern Georgia, the States of Tennessee, Alabama, and -Mississippi, and that portion of the State of Louisiana east of the Mississippi River. The order concluded in the following language : ' General Johnston will, for the purpose of correspondence and reports, establish his headquarters at Chattanooga, or such other place as in his judgment will best secure communication with the troops within the limits of his command, and will repair in person to any part of said command, whenever his presence may for the time be necessary, or desirable.

This command by its terms embraced the armies under command of General Bragg in Tennessee, of General Pemberton at Vicksburg, as well as those at Port Hudson, Mobile, and the forces in East Tennessee.

This general order has never been changed nor modified, so as to affect your command, in a single particular, nor has your control over it been interfered with. I have as Commander-in-Chief given you some orders which will be hereafter noticed, not one of them however indicating in any manner that the general control confided to you was restricted or impaired.

You exercised this command by visiting in person the armies at Murfreesboro, Vicksburg, Mobile, and elsewhere, and on January 22d I wrote to you, directing that you should repair in person to the army at Tullahoma, on account of a reported want of harmony and confidence between General Bragg and his officers and troops. This letter closed with the following passages : ' As that army is part of your command, no order will be necessary to give you authority there, as, whether present or absent, you have a right to direct its operations, and to do whatever belongs to the General Commanding

Language cannot be plainer than this, and although the different armies in your geographical district were ordered to report directly to Richmond as well as to yourself, this was done solely to avoid the evil that would result from reporting through you when your headquarters might be, and it was expected frequently would be, so located as to create delays injurious to the public interest.

While at Tullahoma you did not hesitate to order troops from General Pemberton's army, and learning that you had ordered the division of cavalry from North Mississippi to Tennessee, I telegraphed to you that this order left Mississippi exposed to cavalry raids without means of checking them. You did not change your orders and although I thought them injudicious, I refrained from exercising my authority in deference to your views.

When I learned that prejudice and malignity had so undermined the confidence of the troops at Vicksburg in their commander as to threaten disaster, I deemed the circumstances such as to present the case foreseen in Special Order No. 275, that you should ' repair in person to any part of said command whenever your presence might be for the time necessary or desirable

You were therefore ordered, on May Qth, to ' proceed at once to Mississippi and take chief command of the forces, giving to those in the field, as far as practicable, the encouragement and benefit of your personal direction.'

Some details were added about reinforcements, but not a word affecting in the remotest degree your authority to command your geographical district.

On June 4th you telegraphed to the Secretary of War, in response to his inquiry, saying : ' My only plan is to relieve Vicksburg ; my force is far too small for the purpose. Tell me if you can increase it, and how much/ To which he answered on the 5th : ' I regret inability to promise more troops, as we have drained resources, even to the danger of several points. You know best concerning General Bragg's army, but I fear to withdraw more. We are too far out numbered in Virginia to spare any' etc.

On June 8th the Secretary was more explicit, if possible. He said : ' Do you advise more reinforcements from" General Bragg ? You, as Commandant of the Department, have power so to order if you, in view of the whole case, so determine.'

On June 10th you answered that it was for the Government to determine what department could furnish the reinforcements, that you could not know how General Bragg's wants compared with yours, and that the Government could make the comparison. Your statements that the Government in Richmond was better able to judge of the relative necessities of the armies under your command than you were, and the further statement that you could not know how general Bragg's wants compared with yours, were considered extraordinary ; but as they were accompanied by the remark that the Secretary's despatch had been imperfectly deciphered, no observation was made on them till the receipt of your telegram to the Secretary of the 12th instant, stating, ' I have not considered myself commanding in Tennessee since assignment here, and should not have felt authorized to take troops from that Department after having been informed by the Executive that no more could be spared.'

My surprise at these two statements was extreme. You had never been ' assigned to the Mississippi command/ You went there under the circumstances and orders already quoted, and no justification whatever is perceived for your abandonment of your duties as Commanding General of the geographical district to which you were assigned.

Orders as explicit as those under which you were sent to the West, and under which you continued to act up to May gth, when you were directed to repair in person to Mississippi, can only be impaired or set aside by subsequent orders, equally explicit ; and your announcement that you had ceased to consider yourself charged with the control of affairs in Tennessee because ordered to repair in person to Mississippi, both places being within the command to which you were assigned, was too grave to be overlooked ; and when to this was added the assertion that you should not have felt authorized to draw troops from that Department (Tennessee) after being informed by the Executive that no more could be spared,' I was unable to account for your language, being entirely confident that I had never given you any such information.

I shall now proceed to separate your two statements, and begin with that which relates to your ' not considering ' yourself commanding in Tennessee, since assignment ' here,' i.e., in Mississippi.

When you received my telegram of June 15th, informing you that 'the order to go to Mississippi did not diminish your authority in Tennessee, both being in the country placed under your command in original assignment/ accompanied by an inquiry about the information said to have been derived from me, restricting your authority to transfer troops, your answer on June 16th was, ' I meant to tell the Secretary of War, that I considered the order directing me to command here as limiting my authority to this Department, especially when that order was accompanied by War Department orders transferring troops from Tennessee to Mississippi.'

This is in substance a repetition of the previous statement without any reason being given for it. The fact of orders being sent to you to transfer some of the troops in your Department from one point to another to which you were proceeding in person, could give no possible ground for your ' considering' that Special Order, No. 275, was rescinded or modified. Your command of your geographical district did not make you independent of my orders as your superior officer, and when you were directed by me to take troops with you to Mississippi, your control over the district to which you were assigned was in no way involved. But the statement that troops. were transferred from Tennessee to Mississippi by order of the War Department, when you were directed to repair to the latter State, gives but half the fact, for although you were ordered to take with you three thousand good troops, you were told to replace them by a greater number, then on their way to Mississippi, and whom you were requested to divert to Tennessee, the purpose being to hasten reinforcements to Pemberton without weakening Bragg. This was in deference to your own opinion, that Bragg could not be safely weakened, nay, that he ought even to be reinforced at Pemberton's expense ; for you had just ordered troops from Pemberton's command to reinforce Bragg. I differed in opinion from you, and thought Vicksburg far more exposed to danger than Bragg, and was urging forward reinforcements to that point, both from Carolina and Virginia, before you were directed to assume command in person in Mississippi.

I find nothing then either in your despatch of June 16th, nor in any subsequent communication from you, giving a justification for your saying, that you ' had not considered yourself commanding in Tennessee, since assignment here' (i.e., in Mississippi). Your despatch of the 5th instant is again a substantial repetition of the same statement with out a word of reason to justify it. You say, I considered my assignment to the immediate command in Mississippi as giving me a new position, and limiting my authority to this Department.' I have characterized this as a grave error, and in view of all the facts can not otherwise regard it. I must add that a review of your correspondence shows a constant desire on your part, beginning early in January, that I should change the order placing Tennessee and Mississippi in one command under your direction, and a constant indication on my part, whenever I wrote on the subject, that in my judgment the public service required that the armies should be subject to your control.

I now proceed to your second statement, in your telegram of June 12th, that 'you should not have felt authorized to take troops from that Department (Tennessee) after having been informed by the Executive that no more could be spared.'

To my inquiry for the basis of this statement, you answered on the 16th, by what was in substance a reiteration of it.

I again requested, on the 17th, that you should refer by date to any such communication as that alleged by you. You answered on June 2Oth, apologized for carelessness in your first reply, and referred me to a passage from my telegram to you of May 2Oth, and to one from the Secretary of War of June 5th, and then informed me that you considered Executive ' as including the Secretary of War.

Your telegram of June 12th was addressed to the Secretary of War in the second person ; it begins ' Your despatch/ and then speaks of the Executive in the third person, and on reading it, it was not supposed that the word 'Executive' referred to anyone but myself; but of course, in a matter like this, your own explanation of your meaning is conclusive.

The telegram of the Secretary of War of June 5th, followed by that of June 8th, conveyed unmistakably the very reverse of the meaning you attribute to them, and your reference to them as supporting your position is unintelligible. I revert therefore to my telegram of May 28th. That telegram was in answer to one from you in which you stated that, on the arrival of certain reinforcements, then on the way, you would have about 23,000; that Pemberton could be saved only by beating Grant ; and you added, unless you can promise more troops we must try with that number. The odds against us will be very great. Can you add seven thousand ? '

My reply was ' The reinforcements sent to you exceed by, say seven thousand, the estimate of your despatch of 2 7th instant. We have withheld nothing which it was practicable to give you. We cannot hope for numerical quantity, and time will probably increase the disparity.'

It is on this language that you rely to support a statement that I informed you no more troops could be spared from Tennessee, and as restricting your right to draw troops from that Department. It bears no such construction. The reinforcements sent to you, with an exception presently to be noticed, were from points outside of your Department. You had, in telegrams of May 1st, 2d, and 7th, and others, made repeated applications to have troops withdrawn from other Departments to your aid ; you were informed that we would give all the aid we possibly could. Of your right to order any change made in the distribution of troops in your own district, no doubt had ever been suggested by yourself, nor could occur to your superiors here, for they had given you the authority. The reinforcements which went with you from Tennessee were (as already explained and as was communicated to you at the time) a mere exchange for other troops sent from Virginia.

The troops subsequently sent to you from Bragg were forwarded by him under the following despatch from me of May 22d: The vital issue of holding the Mississippi at Vicksburg is dependent on the success of General Johnston in an attack on the investing force. The intelligence from there is discouraging. Can you aid him ? If so, and you are without orders from General Johnston, act on your judgment

The words that I now underscore suffice to show how thoroughly your right of command of the troops in Tennessee was recognized. I knew from your own orders that you thought it more advisable to draw troops from Mississippi to reinforce Bragg, than to send troops from the latter to Pemberton ; and one of the reasons which induced the instruction to you to proceed to Mississippi was the conviction that your views on the point would be changed on arrival in Mississippi. Still, although convinced myself that troops might be spared from Bragg's army without very great danger, and that Vicksburg was on the contrary in imminent peril, I was unwilling to overrule your judgment of the distribution of your troops while you were on the spot, and, therefore, simply left to General Bragg the power to aid you, if he could, and if you had not given contrary orders.

The cavalry sent to you from Tennessee was sent on a similar despatch from the Secretary of War to General Bragg, informing him of your earnest appeal for cavalry, and asking hint if he could spare any. Your request was for a regiment of cavalry to be sent to you from Georgia. My despatch of May 18th pointed out to you the delay which a compliance would involve, and suggested that cavalry could be drawn from another part of your Department, as had been previously indicated.

In no manner, by no act, by no language, either of myself or of the Secretary of War, has your authority to draw troops from one portion of your Department to another been withdrawn, restricted, or modified.

Now that Vicksburg has disastrously fallen, this subject would present no pressing demand for attention, and its examination would have been postponed to a future period, had not your despatch of the 5th instant, with its persistent repetition of statements which I had informed you were erroneous and with out adducing a single fact to sustain them, induced me to terminate the matter at once by a review of all the facts.

The original mistakes in your telegram of June 12th, would gladly have been overlooked as accidental, if acknowledged when pointed out. The perseverance with which they have been insisted on, has not permitted me to pass them by as a mere oversight, or, by refraining from an answer, to seem to admit the justice of some of the statements.

Respectfully, etc.,

(Signed) JEFFERSON DAVIS.
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Old 30 Nov 10, 10:22
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I'll link several sites that contain some amazing primary documentation:
http://dlxs.library.cornell.edu/m/mayantislavery/

http://civilwarcauses.org/

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/alhtml/malhome.html

http://www.teacheroz.com/Civil_War_Documents.htm

http://digital.library.cornell.edu/m/moa/browse.html

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/...t:2001.05.0001

http://jeffersondavis.rice.edu/cwlinks.cfm

http://showcase.netins.net/web/creative/lincoln.html
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The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.
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[Note: (14)
E 29
Examined for War Records
COPI[ED] ]

Richmond VaVirginia
12 Jany.January 65
F.P.Francis Preston Blair Esqr.Esquire

Sir,

I have deemed
it proper and probably
desirable to you to give you
in this form the substance
of remarks made by me
to be repeated by you to
Prest.President Lincoln, [Illegible: r ar] .

I have no disposition to
find obstacles in forms, and
am willing now as [Illegible: hise-
topore] to enter into nego-
ciationsRegularized:
negotiations
for the restoration
of Peace, am ready to send
a commission whenever
I have reason to suppose
it will be received, or to
receive a [Illegible: commission] if
the U. S. Govt.Government shall choose
to send one. That not-
withstandingRegularized:
notwithstanding
the uniform
rejection with which of our
former offers had been
received, I would if you
could promise that a
Commissioner Minister
or other Agent would
be received, have appoint one
immediately appointed
and renew the effort to
enter into conference with
a view to secure peace
to the two countries.

yours &c

(Duplicate) Jefferson Davis

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Old 30 Nov 10, 11:10
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Executive Office, Opelousas
Baton Rouge, La.Louisiana September 12. 1862
Hon.Honorable Jeff.Jefferson Davis
President H. H.
Richmond

Sir,


I have learned with
Regret that my letter to you of the 23d of
July 1862 has given you pain. It was
not my intention in that letter to attach
any blame to yourself or to intimate
that you had been derelict in to your
duties as the Chief Executive of the country.
I therefore disclaim having intentionally
written anything in that letter to give you
pain and by that I be allowed to
withdraw the entire letter from the
public archives or that this disclaimer
be affixed to it.

I wrote the letter referred to
under a sense of acute personal aggra
vationRegularized:
aggravation
from the manner in which I had
been insulted by officers of the Confederate army,

and in this connection I would refer to my
letters to the Secretary of War regarding the
lawless & shameless seizure made at Alexan-
driaRegularized:
Alexandria by Gen one Captain Taylor, to which
I have as yet received no satisfactory reply,
to my letter regarding the seizure of state
arms by Genl.General Van Dorn which have not yet
been returned to me. I admit that General
Van Dorn's official folly & personal rudeness
to me caused me to indulge in feelings towards
him which found expression in my communica
tionsRegularized:
communications
to the Sec'ySecretary of War & which had better
been suppressed. In conclusion, however, I
desire to assure you that if I have written
anything which might appear harsh or
unjust, my aggravation has been great,
and I cheerfully take the opportunity of
repeating that nothing has been farther from
my intention than to express my complaints to
you in a disagreeable or improper manner
and that I desire particularly to withdraw
my letter of the 23d July on account of the pain
it may have caused you by my inadvertence.

Very Truly Your
Obedient Servant
Tho. Thomas O. Moore Gov

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Old 30 Nov 10, 11:24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by General Brock View Post
Robert - you she see if they can make this a sticky.
I also went back to my first posting and added research links to places like the LOC and West Point etc....
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Old 30 Nov 10, 11:31
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VICKSBURG IS
OURS.

Unconditional Surrender.

31,000 PRISONERS TAKEN!!

128 Pieces Field Artillery.

EIGHTY SEIGE GUNS:

OFFICIAL ACCOUNTS!!
Dispatches from Gen. Grant to
Gen. Banks.

From the Era correspondent.
BEFORE PORT HUDSON
July 7, 1863.

Vicksburg is ours. The great “Gibraltar
of America” has succumbed to
the might of the Union arms, and the
cause of justice and freedom has once
again triumphed over those who would
tear down the glorious edifice raised by
our fathers.

About 9 o'clock this morning a gun-boat
arrived above Port Hudson direct,
from Vicksburg, bringing dispatches
from Major General Ulyses S. Grant.
to both General Banks and Admiral
Farragut, that at 10 o'clock
A. M. on the Fourth of July, General
Pemberton surrendered unconditionally.

By this surrender there fell into our
hands 31,000 men, 128 pieces of field
artillery, and 80 seige guns.

The dispatches were read to the army
and navy, and the most intense excitement
and enthusiasm prevailed. A salute
was fired by both the upper and
lower fleet, and all the bands in the
army struck up national and patriotic
airs.
Official Dispatch from General
Grant to General Banks.

The following copy of a dispatch has
been received by General Emory, commanding
Defences of New Orleans:
Headquarters Department of Tennessee,
Near Vicksburg, July 4, 1863
Major General N. P. BANKS, Commanding
Department of the Gulf:

The garrison of Vicksburg surrendered
this morning. The number of
prisoners, as given by the officers, is
31,000; field artillery, 128 pieces, and
a large number of seige guns probably
not less than eighty. The other stores
will not probably amount to much.

(Signed) I am, General,
Very respectfully
Your obedient servant
U. S. GRANT,
Major General.

P. S. The above news has been fully
authenticated.

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Old 30 Nov 10, 11:32
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Old 30 Nov 10, 11:37
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Murphy, Charles J. (Charles Joseph), 1832 -1921, Reminiscences of the war of the rebelion (New York: F.J. Ficker, 1882)

Reminiscences of the war of the rebelion [Digital Version]

http://sansa.rice.edu/view_item.php?id=816

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Old 30 Nov 10, 13:02
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More letters to Jefferson from Duke;



http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/gree...863-07-16.html
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Old 30 Nov 10, 13:05
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Camp Casey, Dec. 13, 1862
Dear Brother,
I this afternoon seat myself to write you a few lines to let you know that I am still in the land of the living right side up. With care we are camped five miles from Washington in Maryland half a mile from the line between the District Columbia and Maryland. We left Harrisburgh [Harrisburg] on the first day December. We put our horses in the cars and run them to Baltimore. We took them out there and fed them. Rode through the City bare backed and with our rope halters to the next station. We have got no saddles or bridles yet and there is not much sign of us getting them. Soon there was thirty of our men detailed to go to the City for provost guards but we could not go without saddles. We will be kept here all winter for that kind of duty. One company goes down one day and the next day another goes down and relieves them. It will be a nice job for this winter to ride around through the streets and take up the stragglers that is running around without passes. We can hear the cannons boom here everyday from the forts around Washington. I will close now by sending my love to all the family.

Your brother
W. H. Thomas
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