HistoryNet.com RSS
ArmchairGeneral.com RSS

HistoryNet.com Articles
America's Civil War
American History
Aviation History
Civil War Times
MHQ
Military History
Vietnam
Wild West
World War II

ACG Online
ACG Magazine
Stuff We Like
War College
History News
Tactics 101
Carlo D'Este
Books

ACG Gaming
Boardgames
PC Game Reviews

ACG Network
Contact Us
Our Newsletter
Meet Our Staff
Advertise With Us

Sites We Support
HistoryNet.com
StreamHistory.com
Once A Marine
The Art of Battle
Game Squad
Mil. History Podcast
Russian Army - WW2
Achtung Panzer!
Mil History Online

Go Back   Armchair General and HistoryNet >> The Best Forums in History > Historical Events & Eras > American Age of Discovery, Colonization, Revolution, & Expansion > American Colonial Era

Notices and Announcements

American Colonial Era 1660-1763 The growth of North American colonies, often with a change in native & national control.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 19 Sep 04, 15:35
HiredGoon's Avatar
HiredGoon HiredGoon is offline
ACG Forums - General Staff
United_States
Distinguished Service Award ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: The third coast
Posts: 1,992
HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200]
Thanks guys. Maybe I'll post some more soon. I didn't post much on the frenchies, but then again, who really cares about them anyways?
__________________
"The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 28 Sep 04, 00:57
HiredGoon's Avatar
HiredGoon HiredGoon is offline
ACG Forums - General Staff
United_States
Distinguished Service Award ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: The third coast
Posts: 1,992
HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200] HiredGoon is walking in the light [200]
George Augustus Howe

"Born in England in 1724; died near Fort Ticonderoga, New York, 5 July, 1758. His father, Emanuel Scrope, was second Viscount Howe of the Irish peerage. The son entered the army at an early age, soon rose to distinction, and in 1757 was sent to this country in command of the 60th regiment, arriving in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in July of this year. He was transferred to the command of the 55th infantry in September, promoted brigadier-general in December, and on 6 July, 1758, under Commander-in-Chief James Abercrombie, landed at the outlet of Lake George. Coming suddenly upon the French force two days afterward at Fort Ticonderoga, he fell at the head of his corps in the ensuing skirmish. Howe was idolized by his men, and exercised much influence with his officers, whom he induced by his example to dress and fare like the common soldiers, and to abandon the luxurious habits that were then in vogue. A contemporaneous historian says in allusion to his death, "With him the soul of the army seemed to expire." The general court of Massachusetts appropriated £250 for his monument, which was erected in Westminster Abbey."

Howe was a major advocate of light infantry during the French and Indian War. He went on scouting patrols with Robert Rogers and learned the irregular tactics necessary for the North American forest warfare. His entire regiment was a light regiment rather than just one company. He had his men cut their hair short to a length of a couple inches, as well as their tricorn hats, which were cut down into round hats with a 2" brim. The men got rid of their waistcoats and cut their regimentals to waist length. All lace was removed from the regimentals. Green wool indian style leggings were worn instead of the traditional gaitors. Swords were replaced with tomahawks, muskets were shortened, and the men carried powder horns. The ten best marksmen were issued a rifle. Officers were denied their usual heavy baggage, and allowed only one portmanteau, 1 wool blanket and 1 bearskin. They carried fusils, and wore only a gorget to distinguish themselves as officers, removing their bright scarlet sashes.

George Augustus Howe was the older brother of Admiral Richard Howe, and William Howe commander-in-chief of British forces in North America during the American Revolution.
__________________
"The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."

Last edited by HiredGoon; 28 Sep 04 at 20:28..
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11 Aug 06, 13:05
johnbryan's Avatar
johnbryan johnbryan is offline
General of the Forums
United_States
ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon Best Pin-Up Of World War II 
 
Real Name: John
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Michigan
Posts: 25,893
johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+]
johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+] johnbryan has achieved enlightenment [1200+]
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiredGoon
George Augustus Howe

"Born in England in 1724; died near Fort Ticonderoga, New York, 5 July, 1758. His father, Emanuel Scrope, was second Viscount Howe of the Irish peerage. The son entered the army at an early age, soon rose to distinction, and in 1757 was sent to this country in command of the 60th regiment, arriving in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in July of this year. He was transferred to the command of the 55th infantry in September, promoted brigadier-general in December, and on 6 July, 1758, under Commander-in-Chief James Abercrombie, landed at the outlet of Lake George. Coming suddenly upon the French force two days afterward at Fort Ticonderoga, he fell at the head of his corps in the ensuing skirmish. Howe was idolized by his men, and exercised much influence with his officers, whom he induced by his example to dress and fare like the common soldiers, and to abandon the luxurious habits that were then in vogue. A contemporaneous historian says in allusion to his death, "With him the soul of the army seemed to expire." The general court of Massachusetts appropriated £250 for his monument, which was erected in Westminster Abbey."

Howe was a major advocate of light infantry during the French and Indian War. He went on scouting patrols with Robert Rogers and learned the irregular tactics necessary for the North American forest warfare. His entire regiment was a light regiment rather than just one company. He had his men cut their hair short to a length of a couple inches, as well as their tricorn hats, which were cut down into round hats with a 2" brim. The men got rid of their waistcoats and cut their regimentals to waist length. All lace was removed from the regimentals. Green wool indian style leggings were worn instead of the traditional gaitors. Swords were replaced with tomahawks, muskets were shortened, and the men carried powder horns. The ten best marksmen were issued a rifle. Officers were denied their usual heavy baggage, and allowed only one portmanteau, 1 wool blanket and 1 bearskin. They carried fusils, and wore only a gorget to distinguish themselves as officers, removing their bright scarlet sashes.

George Augustus Howe was the older brother of Admiral Richard Howe, and William Howe commander-in-chief of British forces in North America during the American Revolution.
Hired Goon, That was some very, very good writing and made for some facinating reading! Thanks!
__________________
"Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 16 Jun 09, 18:51
Gideon's Avatar
Gideon Gideon is offline
First Sergeant
United_States
 
Real Name: Bob
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Montana
Posts: 273
Gideon is on the path to success [1-99] Gideon is on the path to success [1-99]
Gideon

Thanks for the wonderful outlines of notable personalities in the F+I war period. I enjoyed the piece on Israel Putnam because of familial ties...my wife is a colineal descendent of him and a linear descendent of Gen. Rufus Putnam, Gen. Washington's Chief Engineer. I can't claim any such exaulted position for my ancestors.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 17 Jun 09, 14:46
Lance Williams's Avatar
Lance Williams Lance Williams is offline
ACG Forums - General Staff
United_States
Distinguished Service Award ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon Greatest Westerns Campaign 
Greatest Spy Movies Campaign 
 
Real Name: Lance Williams
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Herndon, Va
Posts: 8,786
Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gideon View Post
Thanks for the wonderful outlines of notable personalities in the F+I war period. I enjoyed the piece on Israel Putnam because of familial ties...my wife is a colineal descendent of him and a linear descendent of Gen. Rufus Putnam, Gen. Washington's Chief Engineer. I can't claim any such exaulted position for my ancestors.
I'm glad that you're enjoying the forum. HiredGoon knows more about the F&I War period than anyone here. I think you might be our first member from Montana.
__________________
Lance W.

Peace through superior firepower.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links

  #21  
Old 17 Jun 09, 15:58
Gideon's Avatar
Gideon Gideon is offline
First Sergeant
United_States
 
Real Name: Bob
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Montana
Posts: 273
Gideon is on the path to success [1-99] Gideon is on the path to success [1-99]
Gideon

Thanks Lance. Not many of us are in MT, and that's a good thing, and only a third of the people who are have internet services, or so I am told. Have some ranches in SE MT that just got electricity. Maybe MT readership will pick up as more people discover the wonders of 20th century technology. The F+I War period is unfortunately glossed over and the period of the colonial wars is almost forgotten. HiredGoon...I used to hunt rabbits on the edge of the Great Swamp and I've really enjoyed the posts on King Phillip's War.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 17 Jun 09, 18:09
Lance Williams's Avatar
Lance Williams Lance Williams is offline
ACG Forums - General Staff
United_States
Distinguished Service Award ACG Ten Year Service Award 5 Year Service Ribbon Greatest Westerns Campaign 
Greatest Spy Movies Campaign 
 
Real Name: Lance Williams
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Herndon, Va
Posts: 8,786
Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400] Lance Williams has a spectacular aura about [400]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gideon View Post
Thanks Lance. Not many of us are in MT, and that's a good thing, and only a third of the people who are have internet services, or so I am told. Have some ranches in SE MT that just got electricity. Maybe MT readership will pick up as more people discover the wonders of 20th century technology. The F+I War period is unfortunately glossed over and the period of the colonial wars is almost forgotten. HiredGoon...I used to hunt rabbits on the edge of the Great Swamp and I've really enjoyed the posts on King Phillip's War.
You joined at a good time. It's only since the first of the year that this period in North America is in it's own sub-forum. Prior to that it was all mixed in the Napoleonic and colonial forums. Even now I'm still doing some housekeeping to combine multiple threads on the same subject which is why you see some threads being moved.

The one thing that the folks at the ACG try to do it to give all periods the attention that they deserve. When we were part of the Napoleonic forum good threads just got buried too soon due to the number of new threads that were created, but since we've been our own sub-forum we've definitely been getting more traffic.

If you're ever looking for something specific the search function works well. Or you can alway send me a PM if you want.

Lance/moderator
__________________
Lance W.

Peace through superior firepower.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 18 Jun 09, 10:20
PGT Beauregard's Avatar
PGT Beauregard PGT Beauregard is offline
General of the Forums
France
5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Real Name: J-B.
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: France
Posts: 6,275
PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700]
PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700] PGT Beauregard is a glorious beacon of light [700]
Louis Coulon de Villiers

A french canadian who won the battle of fort Necessity against Washington
__________________
à vaincre sans péril, on triomphe sans gloire (triumph without peril brings no glory) P. Corneille

Le probleme avec les cons, c'est qu'il ne se fatiguent jamais
(The problem with Pr.cks, is that they never get tired ) Michel Audiard
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 28 Aug 09, 23:26
cavalryscout's Avatar
cavalryscout cavalryscout is offline
Private
United_States
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: bear
Posts: 7
cavalryscout is on the path to success [1-99]
Wolfe at Quebec

Wolfe died in the arms of a highlander from the 78th Fraser's Highlanders. The chief of my clan raised them after the last Jacobite war and they were the ones who confused the French sentries by speaking to them in French while scaling the Heights of Abraham prior to the general engagement. Legend has it Wolfe would not execute a Fraser clansman after Culloden when ordered to do so by Bloody Billy Cumberland.

The 78th came back to America in the revolution and fought as the 71st Highlanders.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03 Sep 09, 11:25
tank brigade's Avatar
tank brigade tank brigade is offline
Staff Sergeant
Canada
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 125
tank brigade is on the path to success [1-99] tank brigade is on the path to success [1-99]
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavalryscout View Post
Wolfe died in the arms of a highlander from the 78th Fraser's Highlanders. The chief of my clan raised them after the last Jacobite war and they were the ones who confused the French sentries by speaking to them in French while scaling the Heights of Abraham prior to the general engagement. Legend has it Wolfe would not execute a Fraser clansman after Culloden when ordered to do so by Bloody Billy Cumberland.

The 78th came back to America in the revolution and fought as the 71st Highlanders.
Another, later become famous personality, present at the naval Siege of Quebec was captain James Cook (then only the chief petty officer), he helped to navigate the large British gunships up the river to the Rock
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 11 Sep 09, 19:32
Jannie's Avatar
Jannie Jannie is offline
Major General
United_States
5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: O'Fallon
Posts: 2,978
Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300] Jannie is on a distinguished road [300]
I have a little information about a man who is listed as being in “Roger’s Own” company, referring to Rogers' Rangers.

Martin Severance was born in 1718. His parents were Joseph Severance and Anna Kellogg. She being a sister to Martin Kellogg and a half-sister to Joseph Kellogg, Rebecca Kellogg and Joanna Kellogg all of who were prisoners of the French and Indians dating from the 1704 Raid on Deerfield.

Martin Severance’s brothers Joseph Severance and Samuel Severance were killed by the Indians at Crown Point on Lake Champlain in 1748 at the Salmon Hole Massacre. Their brother Jonathan Severance was a Lieutenant in the Old French War and it is said held himself aloof from the military in the Revolution, Moses Severance, another brother, was a Ranger in Burke’s Company in 1757.

Martin Severance would have been a man who hated the French and especially the Indians rather heartily. His family had suffered several deaths and injuries in attacks from Indians. His own father was described as being crippled in an attack and had received a land allotment for his injury.

We are not for sure when Martin began his military duties but he is on the lists at Fort Dummer on the Connecticut River in New Hampshire in 1738 under the command of his uncle Joseph Kellogg at about the age of 20.

In 1747 he shows up in a scouting party that was sent to Lake Champlain to watch the enemy, word having been received that the French were gathering an army there. He is mentioned again in March of 1756 on another scouting party. Then in October of 1756 he is found at Fort Edward.

I also found him mentioned in a few other places

Surgeon Thomas Williams in a letter to his wife Aug. '25th, 1756, acknowledges receipt of one from her by hand of Sergeant Severance who had been on a scout. Damson's Historical Magazine April, 1870.

Journal of Gen. Rufus Putnam kept in northern New York during four campaigns ... By Rufus Putnam, Ephraim Cutler Dawes
1756, October ye 2. A Frenchman taken between this Fort and the Lake by some Connecticut men was brought in. This day I went out a scout for three days with Sergt. Martain Sephorance1 of Major Roger's Company. In our Scout we discovered nothing remarkable. We steered our course up the great River.

1 Probably Sergeant Martin Severance.

Martin Severance is mentioned as a Lieutenant sometime around December, 1756 in the book War on the Run:The Epic Story of Robert Rogers and the Conquest of America by John F. Ross

Then on June 25, 1758, Martin and his nephew Matthew Severance, another man from Deerfield, Agrippa Wells and William Clark from Colrain, Massachusetts were captured by the Indians on Sabbath Day Point on Lake George. According to an account in a local history book in rowing across the lake Matthew was compelled to assist in the rowing. “While so employed one of the Indians vexed him, and Severance resented the insolence, when the Indian slapped his face and knocked off his hat” Severance raised his oar and knocked the Indian in the head with it and sent him overboard. When they arrived in Canada, Matthew Severance and others were made to run the gauntlet but Martin refused and dared them to make him do it. He was excused. He was apparently turned over to the French and exchanged to London. He signed on to the armed ship Essex to get home.

From The History of Rogers’ Rangers: Rogers' Rangers, the First Green Berets
By Burt Garfield Loescher

“Rogers was continually intervening for his scattered flock. On May 11 [1759], he vouched for five veteran Rangers and saved them from being pressed into the navy. Sergeant William Clark arrived in Albany to inform the amazed Rogers that he and four other captive Rangers in 1758 had been carried to Quebec, then exchanged to England, and had finally worked their way to New York on the armed ship Essex. The ship’s commander, John Curtin, was reluctant to part with them and he confined them on board when they anchored in New York; but the Ranger-Seamen were determined not to serve a life sentence on the Essex and Clark made his “elopement” on May 4, and a week later he arrived footsore in Albany. Rogers immediately sent a Sergeant with Clark’s account to Schomberg of the Diana, who was Curtin’s superior. He in turn relayed the sergeant to Amherst who ordered Curtin to deliver the Rangers to the Sergeant. The grateful Rangers who were returned to the Corps were Sergeants Martin Severance and Joshua Conky of Rogers’ own; Privates Morris O’Brian and Aggrippa Wells of Burbank’s. Private Conky was a rare captive-survivor of Rogers’ Rock.”

Another tale is told of Martin Severance. He signed up again in the military for the Revolution. And the old local history book says “that one time while in camp and very short of food, he and some companions went foraging and conveyed home their plunder in a coffin shaped box. When they approached a sentinel Severance cried out "Stand aside - dead man - smallpox" and they were given abundance of room to pass. He died at Shelburne Falls, [Massachusetts] April 8, 1810, aged ninety-two years."

Last edited by Jannie; 11 Sep 09 at 19:35..
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 13 Sep 09, 12:05
tank brigade's Avatar
tank brigade tank brigade is offline
Staff Sergeant
Canada
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 125
tank brigade is on the path to success [1-99] tank brigade is on the path to success [1-99]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Graves_Simcoe -,another colonial era personality, the one who captured George Washington and decided that his men should not shoot him
Reply With Quote
Reply

Please bookmark this thread if you enjoyed it!


Thread Tools
Display Modes



Forum Jump

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 13:27.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.