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Go Back   Armchair General and HistoryNet >> The Best Forums in History > Historical Events & Eras > World War II > Governments & Organizations

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Governments & Organizations Unit histories, OOB, political parties, OSS, Waffen-SS; if it has anything to do with the functioning of military or government organizations, this is the place for it.

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  #76  
Old 20 Sep 14, 22:26
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Originally Posted by broderickwells View Post
That was my thought, but I'm wondering if it wasn't the Saurer RR-7, which were also used as radio observation posts.
That's possible (anything is possible) but the Saurer (Sd.Kfz.254) was built in very small numbers (140). They would be very rare by 1943.

If I had to guess, I would say that they were probably in either an Sd.Kfz.250 or Sd.Kfz.251, simply because they were the most common halftracks that could be equipped with radios and would generally be available to infantry units.

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Old 21 Sep 14, 16:35
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I'm reading 'Stalin's keys to Victory' (Dunn) and like Glantz he identifies the formations against Blau I-III July-August as being mostly those formed during the chaos of 1941.

These were a mixed bag and generally weaker in leadership, morale, unit cohesion, weapons, and training. Some units fought hard, while others disintegrated under enough pressure or fumbled in operations (like the tank corps (summer counterstrikes) and some infantry units.

The soviet formations moved into the Stalingrad sector in the fall/winter of 1942 were comparably better trained, and performed noticeably better. This trend can be sensed in 'Leaping horseman'.

I think what stands out with the soviet command and control system is its ruthless commitment of combat units in order to execute a strategy. The soviet forces fought inside Stalingrad were outclassed in terms of firepower and suffered from continuous & accurate aerial bombing on a daily basis by hundreds of bombers. It was not like they were spread out on the steppe; they were all concentrated there in predictable city areas. The bombing would only end in bad weather or nightfall.

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This was a major element in the excellent World At War series . From a diaryof a German soldier, you are illuminated on how tough those damn Bolsheviks can be (even if most were actually peasants).
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Death of the Leaping Horseman: 24th Panzer division in Stalingrad

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=150863

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Old 28 Sep 14, 10:19
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I'm nearing the end of my tactical reading list (have progress into the last six volumes). A good experience Afterwards, I'm moving into my operations reading list.

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Death of the Leaping Horseman: 24th Panzer division in Stalingrad

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Old 09 Oct 14, 15:46
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November 30, 1941, before the final attacks on Tula city. R6 is 3rd Panzer, R35 is 4th Panzer, and R39 is 17th Panzer:

Quote:
In actual fact, the 2. Panzer-Armee had ceased to be an armor field army for some time. It had the following numbers of tanks operational on 30 November: Panzer-Regiment 6, twenty-eight; Panzer-Regiment 35, thirty-four; and Panzer-Regiment 39, ten.

During that time, the 3. Panzer-Division announced its achievements from 22 June to 22 November 1941: 52,289 prisoners taken; 485 tanks, 71 armored cars, 905 artillery pieces, 203 antiaircraft guns, 567 antitank guns, 366 mortars, 1,540 machine guns, 3,130 trucks, 100 staff cars, 19 motorcycles, and 157 tractors captured or destroyed; 89 destroyed, 119 shot-down, and 63 captured aircraft. The fighting forces were 1,300 kilometers from the western borders of Russia and had covered 4,500 kilometers. The ammunition columns had covered 17,000 kilometers; the fuel columns, 20,000.


After the final attacks, December 5th, 1941:

Quote:
That special “distinction” for the division did not fill the officers and enlisted personnel with satisfaction. They knew that the formations only had about half the combat power they once did and that they could barely be considered an armored force any more. The organization, weaponry and equipment of the division is mirrored in these numbers:

Schützen-Regiment 3, with six companies of sixty men each; three antitank guns; six SPW’s
Schützen-Regiment 394, with six companies of fifty men each; no antitank guns
Panzer-Regiment 6, with eighteen Panzer III’s and four Panzer IV’s
Artillerie-Regiment 75, with nineteen light field howitzers, two heavy field howitzers, and three 10-centimeter cannon
Kradschützen-Bataillon 3, with one motorized company and the remaining partially motorized companies
Panzerjäger-Abteilung 521, with eleven self-propelled guns
Panzerjäger-Abteilung 543, with two heavy and one light antitank gun
A few sentences that describes 1943-1945, a near endless crisis for the 3rd Panzer:

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Death of the Leaping Horseman: 24th Panzer division in Stalingrad

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=150863

Last edited by Cult Icon; 10 Oct 14 at 00:58..
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