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Go Back   Armchair General and HistoryNet >> The Best Forums in History > Historical Events & Eras > World War II > Armor in World War II

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Armor in World War II Discuss all aspects & disciplines of World War II Armor here.

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  #271  
Old 24 Apr 17, 13:32
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In my opinion British Centurion I was the greatest tank of WWII. It entered service in the last weeks of the war, it just didn't see combat.

This tank was so cool it was still a legitimate main battle tank until like the 1980s I think.

I think there is a reason why as soon as the war was over most countries quickly forgot about the Tigers or T-34s, but everybody was screaming for money to buy more Centurions.

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  #272  
Old 24 Apr 17, 21:01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MonsterZero View Post
In my opinion British Centurion I was the greatest tank of WWII. It entered service in the last weeks of the war, it just didn't see combat.

This tank was so cool it was still a legitimate main battle tank until like the 1980s I think.

I think there is a reason why as soon as the war was over most countries quickly forgot about the Tigers or T-34s, but everybody was screaming for money to buy more Centurions.
The Centurion did not enter service at that time.
The very first A41 prototype was not delivered until April 1945.
All that occurred were some trials with a few prototypes.
Furthermore, these trials took place after the end of hostilities in the ETO.
The first series production Centurions were not delivered until February 1946 so that is the earliest reasonable date that could be considered as service entry:

Quote:
"Under the codename Operation Sentry, six Centurion prototypes arrived in Belgium soon after VE-Day for trials with the 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards and 5th Royal Tank Regiment.
The trials continued into July and user opinion of the new tank was high, though the 20mm Polsten secondary armament did not find favour and a coaxial machine gun was preferred." ....
.... "Production of the Centurion began in November 1945 and the first models were delivered in February 1946"
Page 8, Centurion Universal Tank 1943-2003, Simon Dunstan, Osprey, 2003

The Centurion as such did not enter service until after the end of WW2 and therefore, should not be considered as a WW2 tank per se.
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  #273  
Old 25 Apr 17, 04:51
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Another well designed late WWII tank from Britain was the A-34 Comet.

Whereas the Centurion I did not see any actual combat in WWII, the Comet was used in the final months of the war.

Both used the 17 pounder (or a variant of it), as this quote from Wiki on the Comet states:
Quote:
Originally, it had been expected that Cromwell would use a new gun from Vickers: the "High Velocity 75mm". However, as designed, the gun would not fit into the turret size available.[5] Development of the gun continued, and as work commenced on the Comet, the gun design evolved into the 77 mm HV.[6] The gun now used the same calibre (76.2 mm) projectile as the 17-pounder, but the cartridge case was from the older QF 3 inch 20 cwt anti-aircraft gun loaded to higher pressures. The resulting round was completely different from 17-pounder ammunition. Overall the round was shorter, more compact and more easily stored and handled within the tank.

The 77 mm HV was effectively a shortened 17-pounder. This made it possible to mount the gun on a smaller turret ring. The gun was still capable against opponents, and firing APDS rounds, it was more accurate and consistent than APDS from the 17pdr and 6pdr, which were inaccurate over 700m and often ricocheted.
A photo of the A-34 Comet (Soviet T-34 to the right of it) from the same Wiki page:


For a more complete study of the A-34 Comet, this book looks like the way to go: http://www.lulu.com/shop/pm-knight/a...-22977511.html

Regards, Kurt
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  #274  
Old 02 May 17, 18:33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurt Knispel View Post
Another well designed late WWII tank from Britain was the A-34 Comet.

Whereas the Centurion I did not see any actual combat in WWII, the Comet was used in the final months of the war.

Both used the 17 pounder (or a variant of it), as this quote from Wiki on the Comet states:

A photo of the A-34 Comet (Soviet T-34 to the right of it) from the same Wiki page:


For a more complete study of the A-34 Comet, this book looks like the way to go: http://www.lulu.com/shop/pm-knight/a...-22977511.html

Regards, Kurt
The Comet was a great tank, probably the best 5.5.45, but was too little too late.

The Comet used a completely different gun to the 17pdr. It had the same calibre and shor/shell as the 17pdr, but that was about it.

The Comet failed on two real issues, both concerning armour. It was decided that a hull mg was required, a mistake. This meant an extra crewman and, because it was a British design, a vertical drivers plate, hence less protection. The same is true for its belly plate, too thin for later WW2 mines. Other than that, the British finally got another decent cruiser, 4 years too late.

Despite its apparent inferiority when compared with the IS-3 during the Berlin parade, this was the tank you would want for your armoured divisions, regardless of side.
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