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Go Back   Armchair General and HistoryNet >> The Best Forums in History > Historical Events & Eras > American Age of Discovery, Colonization, Revolution, & Expansion > American Age of Formative Expansion

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American Age of Formative Expansion 1789-1830 To begin with the 1st US President & extend through the Whiskey Rebellion, Quasi War with France, War of 1812, & southeastern Indian wars,

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  #16  
Old 19 Jan 17, 21:26
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Originally Posted by SmackUm View Post
I think the population of Fort York (Toronto) approximately 500 was smaller than that which visited Fort William (Thunder Bay) during Rendezvous approximately 2-3 thousand.
The entire population of Canada was approximately 300 thousand and that of the United States approximately 1 million.
It would be interesting to see the population distribution of NA on a map during the period.
Population of the US in 1810 census was 7.24 million. Not sure where the 1 million came from.
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  #17  
Old 20 Jan 17, 11:19
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Originally Posted by bart dale View Post
Population of the US in 1810 census was 7.24 million. Not sure where the 1 million came from.
Thanks Bart... I seem to recall 8 million now used as a round figure during the period in books I've read like .. The Invasion of Canada & Flames Across the Border by Pierre Berton.
The Toronto of this time period (Fort York) would have been quite small and settled mostly by American's (United Empire Loyalists). It was probably made up of a very young population prone to violent disputes and harsh discipline like most frontier towns.
Detroit must have had it's share of frontier justice during the French Regime and latter just like every other early Fur Trading post along the St. Lawrence River & Great Lakes System.

Regards, Patrick
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  #18  
Old 20 Jan 17, 11:35
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The Lower Canadian economy was boosted by the effective closure of the Baltic during the Napoleonic war when the important timber trade shifted to Canada. Part of my own family had been timber merchants and ship owners trading with the Baltic for at least a century and shifted their business entirely to the North Atlantic trade with Canada. The British ship building industry both merchant and naval became dependent upon Canada for masts and spars - much of the timber coming down the St Lawrence.
I can still see sluice ways in the bush on some local rivers like the Pigeon River on the US Canadian Border. They were primarily after White Pine this was the next boom after Fur Trading to the Canadian Economy.
Thanks for sharing every spring the logs that were towed down to the rivers and lakes were set free and the dams opened to assist in the log drives all over the country.

Thanks for sharing MarkV

Regard's Patrick
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Old 20 Jan 17, 17:18
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Originally Posted by MarkV View Post
The Lower Canadian economy was boosted by the effective closure of the Baltic during the Napoleonic war when the important timber trade shifted to Canada. Part of my own family had been timber merchants and ship owners trading with the Baltic for at least a century and shifted their business entirely to the North Atlantic trade with Canada. The British ship building industry both merchant and naval became dependent upon Canada for masts and spars - much of the timber coming down the St Lawrence.
The Eastern North American white pine was the tree of choice for masts and spars, light but strong due to its' slow growth. Running up to the American Revolution the Royal Navy's confiscation of the trees running up rivers like the Penobscot in Maine became a major source of grievance with New England Colonists. The British Navy would mark the white pines with this mark made with three axe marks known as the "King's Broad Arrow"and with the mark made the tree became the property of the crown, a practice the Royal Navy began in North America in 1691, here is what the mark looked like:



It was a source of grievance with New Englanders to the point of the American colonists deliberately seeking out and cutting the trees so marked. Here is a quote demonstrating the extent of the grievance:

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The Revolutionary War was about many things, and Eastern White Pine weighed heavy on the minds and hearts of the colonists desire for independence. Some historians believe that denial of use of these trees was at least as instrumental as taxation of tea in bringing about the American Revolution and the first acts of rebellion against British rule. In fact, the Eastern White Pine was the emblem emblazoned on the first colonial flag, including one bearing a white pine purportedly flown at the Battle of Bunker Hill.
Here is the "Eastern White Pine Flag" that was purportedly flown at the Battle of Bunker Hill:



That doesn't seem to be much of a flag to rally behind but it is noteworthy that the white pine is the symbol on the the State of Maine's flag, where most of the white pine masts were harvested in British North America prior to the revolution:



After the Revolutionary war the British continued the practice of confiscating white pines for masts for the British Navy in the neighboring (to Maine - then part of Massachusetts) colony of New Brunswick (then part of the colony of Nova Scotia). The two great rivers of New Brunswick - the Miramichi and the St John Rivers (which I live on) were the main rivers the Royal Navy scoured for suitable white pines for ship masts, and indeed, as Mark states, this became very urgent and more pronounced during the Napoleonic Wars once Baltic supplies were cut off, and the St Lawrence river and its' tributaries in Lower Canada were also an important source.

A discussion of the practice of confiscating white pines in pre-revolutionary America using the "King's Broad Arrow" mark and the agitation it created is here:

kings broad arrow/

Last edited by Sparlingo; 20 Jan 17 at 17:35..
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