HistoryNet.com RSS
ArmchairGeneral.com RSS

HistoryNet.com Articles
America's Civil War
American History
Aviation History
British Heritage
Civil War Times
MHQ
Military History
Vietnam
Wild West
World War II

ACG Online
ACG Magazine
Stuff We Like
War College
History News
Tactics 101
Carlo D'Este
Books

ACG Gaming
Boardgames
PC Game Reviews

ACG Network
Contact Us
Our Newsletter
Meet Our Staff
Advertise With Us

Sites We Support
HistoryNet.com
Once A Marine
The Art of Battle
Game Squad
Mil. History Podcast
Russian Army - WW2
Achtung Panzer!
Mil History Online

Go Back   Armchair General and HistoryNet >> The Best Forums in History > Historical Events & Eras > Warfare Through the Ages > The Ancient Era

Notices and Announcements

The Ancient Era Discuss Ancient Warfare! Romans, Carthaginians, Greeks, etc.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07 Apr 12, 10:09
andrewza's Avatar
andrewza andrewza is online now
General
South_Africa
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: siommons town
Posts: 4,147
andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100]
The Roman Cavalry post Gaius Marius

I have all was loved the Roman empire. They had great infantry but what of there cavalry both regular and auxiliary/allied barbarian. I know they where used mainly for screening and recon. Along with protecting the flanks and harassing the enemy's flanks. But where they ever used in a charge. I know they lacked the bridal and saddle of the more advanced cavalry forces. But still where there any famous roman cavalry charges.
Reply With Quote
Facebook Connect and Magazine Promotions

World War II Magazine
$26.95

Armchair General Magazine
$26.95
Military History Magazine
$26.95
  #2  
Old 08 Apr 12, 03:03
Legatus Augusti's Avatar
Legatus Augusti Legatus Augusti is offline
Brigadier General
United_States
Greatest Spy Movies Campaign 
 
Real Name: Kyle
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: SoCal
Posts: 2,277
Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300] Legatus Augusti is on a distinguished road [300]
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrewza View Post
I have all was loved the Roman empire. They had great infantry but what of there cavalry both regular and auxiliary/allied barbarian. I know they where used mainly for screening and recon. Along with protecting the flanks and harassing the enemy's flanks. But where they ever used in a charge. I know they lacked the bridal and saddle of the more advanced cavalry forces. But still where there any famous roman cavalry charges.
I can't think of one off hand...not in the way I think you mean. The "Cavalry Charge" just wasn't a concept that had developed yet.
__________________
Satis elouquentiae sapientiae parum

Diadochi Wars GAME:http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=140484
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08 Apr 12, 03:39
andrewza's Avatar
andrewza andrewza is online now
General
South_Africa
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: siommons town
Posts: 4,147
andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100]
All so can not find any. Hence I asked. I wonder how imported they where to the roman army.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08 Apr 12, 05:54
Surrey's Avatar
Surrey Surrey is offline
Major General
UK
March Offensive 100 Greatest Generals, 2008 5 Year Service Ribbon Summer Campaign 
Most Decisive Battle Campaign, 2008 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Surrey
Posts: 2,949
Surrey is on a distinguished road [300] Surrey is on a distinguished road [300] Surrey is on a distinguished road [300] Surrey is on a distinguished road [300] Surrey is on a distinguished road [300] Surrey is on a distinguished road [300] Surrey is on a distinguished road [300] Surrey is on a distinguished road [300] Surrey is on a distinguished road [300] Surrey is on a distinguished road [300] Surrey is on a distinguished road [300] Surrey is on a distinguished road [300] Surrey is on a distinguished road [300]
Julius Caesar lead the crucial cavalry charge at Alesia.
__________________
Went the day well?
We died and never knew,
But well or ill, Freedom,
We died for you.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08 Apr 12, 06:23
andrewza's Avatar
andrewza andrewza is online now
General
South_Africa
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: siommons town
Posts: 4,147
andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100] andrewza has demonstrated strength of character [100]
I could I forget that battle. And it was the roman cavalry that won the day. With out that charge the lines would have been broken and the roman would have had no where to flee.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08 Apr 12, 07:23
calger14's Avatar
calger14 calger14 is offline
Sergeant Major
UK
 
Real Name: Alex Stephens
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Corinium
Posts: 378
calger14 is on the path to success [1-99] calger14 is on the path to success [1-99] calger14 is on the path to success [1-99]
Pompeys charge at Pharsalus. Was a complete failure and led to Pompey leaving the battlefield but still a cavalry charge.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 17 Apr 12, 07:29
Bluenose's Avatar
Bluenose Bluenose is offline
Lieutenant Colonel
UK
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Warwick
Posts: 1,491
Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100]
Quote:
Julius Caesar lead the crucial cavalry charge at Alesia.
That sounds rather unlikely, on what are you basing this? He may have been on horseback and certainly coordinated the movement of reinforcements (both mounted and dismounted), but I have never seen any indication that he 'lead' the charge.

Quote:
But where they ever used in a charge. I know they lacked the bridal and saddle of the more advanced cavalry forces. But still where there any famous roman cavalry charges.
They used the four-horned saddle which based on modern reconstruction seems to have allowed the rider to 'charge' an enemy without being dragged out of the saddle on impact. However, it's not clear how often cavalry have ever really charged home a formed unit. Some of the auxilia cohorts from 100 AD onwards seem to have been equipped in a style reminiscent of the Parthian / Sarmatian heavy cavalry who were sufficiently protected to charge in to infantry if they chose (though this does not mean that they actually did).
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 20 Apr 12, 00:23
Widow Maker's Avatar
Widow Maker Widow Maker is offline
Major
United_States
5 Year Service Ribbon 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Taglios
Posts: 1,163
Widow Maker has demonstrated strength of character [100] Widow Maker has demonstrated strength of character [100] Widow Maker has demonstrated strength of character [100] Widow Maker has demonstrated strength of character [100] Widow Maker has demonstrated strength of character [100] Widow Maker has demonstrated strength of character [100] Widow Maker has demonstrated strength of character [100] Widow Maker has demonstrated strength of character [100] Widow Maker has demonstrated strength of character [100] Widow Maker has demonstrated strength of character [100]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluenose View Post
That sounds rather unlikely, on what are you basing this? He may have been on horseback and certainly coordinated the movement of reinforcements (both mounted and dismounted), but I have never seen any indication that he 'lead' the charge.



They used the four-horned saddle which based on modern reconstruction seems to have allowed the rider to 'charge' an enemy without being dragged out of the saddle on impact. However, it's not clear how often cavalry have ever really charged home a formed unit. Some of the auxilia cohorts from 100 AD onwards seem to have been equipped in a style reminiscent of the Parthian / Sarmatian heavy cavalry who were sufficiently protected to charge in to infantry if they chose (though this does not mean that they actually did).
They big problem that most cav forces at this time was that you could not imale a man with a spear or a lance at full gallop without being knocked off the horse. Better saddles helped but the real problem was that the stirrup had not been introduced yet. I think the Goths introduced it to the Romans after getting it from the steppe nomads and HUns who were pressing them from the east.
__________________
"Put guards on all the roads, and don't let the men run to the rear."
Major General John Buford's final words on his deathbed.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 20 Apr 12, 01:31
Pruitt's Avatar
Pruitt Pruitt is offline
General of the Forums
United_States
March Offensive 100 Greatest Generals, 2008 5 Year Service Ribbon Distinguished Service Award 
Summer Campaign Most Decisive Battle Campaign, 2008 Greatest Westerns Campaign Greatest Blunders Campaign 
Best Pin-Up Of World War II 
 
Real Name: Richard Pruitt
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Sulphur, LA
Posts: 17,779
Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+]
Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+]
Which period do you want?

The Celtic type saddle allowed a more secure seat on the horse for most Romans. Quite frankly, Roman Citizen Cavalry was taken from the ranks of the wealthy, and they stunk! The Allied Italian, Celtic, Numidian, Spanish and German Cavalry Auxiliaries were so much better at Cavalry fighting.

During the Second Punic War Hannibal's Cavalry routinely ran off the Roman Citizen Cavalry and executed a number of successful charges against them. Most frequently, the Spanish/Celtic Cavalry lined up against the Roman Cavalry while the Numdians lined up against the Allied Italian Cavalry. Almost all these Cavalry were armed with Javelins so I don't see long melees happening often.

Many years later contact with the Sassanids brought development of heavy Cataphract units. This changed tactics some as the best manpower was now usually in the Cavalry. The Eastern Empire often hired Steppe Nomads as Cavalry. That meant a combination of effective Heavy and Light Horse, including Horse Archers!

Pruitt
__________________
Ted Nugent quote to the Troops: "It may be a week until deer hunting season, but its open season on a**holes all year long!"

Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 22 Apr 12, 17:57
Bluenose's Avatar
Bluenose Bluenose is offline
Lieutenant Colonel
UK
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Warwick
Posts: 1,491
Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100]
Quote:
They big problem that most cav forces at this time was that you could not imale a man with a spear or a lance at full gallop without being knocked off the horse. Better saddles helped but the real problem was that the stirrup had not been introduced yet.
As I indicated, that is a rather dated assessment: modern recreations of the pre-stirrup sadles in use 200BC onwards has shown that it was perfectly possible to impale a human target, but again the issue is whether you would want to do this against all but a single fleeing soldier. Indeed, stirrups are arguable of greater use in a meelee when weight transfer with a short-ranged weapon is crucial

Quote:
The Celtic type saddle allowed a more secure seat on the horse for most Romans. Quite frankly, Roman Citizen Cavalry was taken from the ranks of the wealthy, and they stunk! The Allied Italian, Celtic, Numidian, Spanish and German Cavalry Auxiliaries were so much better at Cavalry fighting.

During the Second Punic War Hannibal's Cavalry routinely ran off the Roman Citizen Cavalry and executed a number of successful charges against them. Most frequently, the Spanish/Celtic Cavalry lined up against the Roman Cavalry while the Numdians lined up against the Allied Italian Cavalry. Almost all these Cavalry were armed with Javelins so I don't see long melees happening often.
The Romans were not a 'horse' people and never seem to have evolved anything domestically that rivalled their neighbours or foes. It's a bit unfair to say that they were awful; they were never likely to rival the semi-professional Gaulish / Spanish / North African tribes used by the Carthaginians, hence the Roman use of said people as auxilliaries.

'Roman' cavalry was competent at the liaison and scouting duties to which it was assigned but they used others for more demanding mounted skills
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links

  #11  
Old 22 Apr 12, 18:16
Pruitt's Avatar
Pruitt Pruitt is offline
General of the Forums
United_States
March Offensive 100 Greatest Generals, 2008 5 Year Service Ribbon Distinguished Service Award 
Summer Campaign Most Decisive Battle Campaign, 2008 Greatest Westerns Campaign Greatest Blunders Campaign 
Best Pin-Up Of World War II 
 
Real Name: Richard Pruitt
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Sulphur, LA
Posts: 17,779
Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+]
Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+]
The Romans recruited Cavalry from citizens who could afford to furnish the horse. These were referred to as the Order of the Knights. I believe they had their own assembly below the Senate in power. Romans further aggravated this problem by keeping them together as a unit and fighting them as such. If you know of a battle where they stood and fought and beat an opponent, I would love to hear about it.

The hard part was even after citizenship was extended to Italian Allies that furnished Cavalry, the quality of the Roman Cavalry remained low.

Pruitt
__________________
Ted Nugent quote to the Troops: "It may be a week until deer hunting season, but its open season on a**holes all year long!"

Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 23 Apr 12, 04:48
Bluenose's Avatar
Bluenose Bluenose is offline
Lieutenant Colonel
UK
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Warwick
Posts: 1,491
Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100]
Quote:
The Romans recruited Cavalry from citizens who could afford to furnish the horse. These were referred to as the Order of the Knights. I believe they had their own assembly below the Senate in power. Romans further aggravated this problem by keeping them together as a unit and fighting them as such. If you know of a battle where they stood and fought and beat an opponent, I would love to hear about it.
The equestrians were certainly named for their ability to provide horses as part of the traditional Roman military division of responsibility, they had no Ďassemblyí but from their rank and above were drawn the Senate (but itís a little difficult to pigeon-hole them). As for 'keeping them together', there was a Master of Horse as a deputy commander rank but there is no evidence that there was always a dogmatic retention of mass (or good evidence for many things that are often assumed, the Marian reforms being a classic example). As I explained above, they were more used for liaison and reconnaissance.

Unfortunately, ancient sources are rarely complete enough to determine the exact composition of cavalry (though sometimes there is a recorded distinction). Plenty of Roman battles pre-reform were won with Cavalry; I donít have time to look them up right now but it was far from the useless force you seem to suggest. However, they were also beaten plenty of times because, as I indicated above, they were against far better horsemen. The Romans certainly acknowledge this themselves.

Quote:
The hard part was even after citizenship was extended to Italian Allies that furnished Cavalry, the quality of the Roman Cavalry remained low.
Again, as I said, the Italians were not a 'horse' people and never fielded cavalry as good as other nations, hence their recruitment of cavalry auxiliaries
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 23 Apr 12, 08:09
Bluenose's Avatar
Bluenose Bluenose is offline
Lieutenant Colonel
UK
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Warwick
Posts: 1,491
Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100]
Something from an interesting chat here: http://www.romanarmytalk.com/rat.htm...d=17&id=278996

Quote:
The horse being thus equipped and, as it were, encased, the rider bestrides him, not vaulting of himself into the saddle, but lifted up by others because of his weight. When the moment comes to engage in battle, he gives his horse the rein, applies his spurs, and in full career charges the enemy, to all appearance some man made of iron, or a mobile statue wrought with the hammer. 6. His pike projects with its point thrust far ahead: it is supported by a loop attached to the horseís neck, and has its butt-end suspended by a strap alongside the horseís haunches; so that it does not recede in the clashes of conflict, but lightens the task of the riderís hand, which only directs the blow. He braces himself and, firmly set so as to increase the gravity of the wound, by his mere impetus transfixes anyone who comes in his way, and may often impale two persons at a single stroke.í Heliodorus, Aethiopica.Bk IX on description of the Cataphract.
May or may not be 100% accurate but by this stage there does seem to have been an emphasis on heavy cavalry able to inflict serious damage on infantry. The inability to get into the saddle is interesting; medieval knights could without assistance thanks the the stirrups.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 23 Apr 12, 10:36
Pruitt's Avatar
Pruitt Pruitt is offline
General of the Forums
United_States
March Offensive 100 Greatest Generals, 2008 5 Year Service Ribbon Distinguished Service Award 
Summer Campaign Most Decisive Battle Campaign, 2008 Greatest Westerns Campaign Greatest Blunders Campaign 
Best Pin-Up Of World War II 
 
Real Name: Richard Pruitt
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Sulphur, LA
Posts: 17,779
Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+]
Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+] Pruitt has achieved enlightenment [1200+]
Bluenose,

Several Italian "Allied" states were known for having good Cavalry. The Tarantine Cavalry had a good rep. When Rome went to war they levied Infantry and Cavalry from their Allies. In my example of the 2nd Punic War, the Allied Cavalry usually could stand up well to the Numidian Light Cavalry. It was after the Roman Citizen Cavalry routed that the Spanish/Gallic Cavalry came around and hit the Allied Cavalry in the rear that forced a rout. As time went on the Roman Citizen Cavalry was used less and less with Barbarian Auxiliaries used instead. Julius Caesar was very fond of his German Cavalry, although his Gallic Cavalry normally out numbered them. Probably the best Roman answer was Barbarian Cavalry under Roman Officers.

Pruitt
__________________
Ted Nugent quote to the Troops: "It may be a week until deer hunting season, but its open season on a**holes all year long!"

Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 23 Apr 12, 11:05
Bluenose's Avatar
Bluenose Bluenose is offline
Lieutenant Colonel
UK
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Warwick
Posts: 1,491
Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100] Bluenose has demonstrated strength of character [100]
I am fully conversant with Roman political and military history

Quote:
Several Italian "Allied" states were known for having good Cavalry. The Tarantine Cavalry had a good rep.
It was a Hellenic light cavalry, it's not clear in what numbers it was used or if it were often any good. Nevertheless it is still an exception to the general premise that Italy was not a cavalry region in this period. You could also have mentioned Capuan Cavalry but this does not change the fact that - on the whole - Italian-levied cavalry remained a relatively poorer performer.

Quote:
When Rome went to war they levied Infantry and Cavalry from their Allies.
Yes, they levied the alae from non-citizens to compliment the Roman legion levies. However, you must be very careful declaring that part of a battle involved one or the other; sources are often contradictory and may well be written with a political point.

Quote:
In my example of the 2nd Punic War, the Allied Cavalry usually could stand up well to the Numidian Light Cavalry. It was after the Roman Citizen Cavalry routed that the Spanish/Gallic Cavalry came around and hit the Allied Cavalry in the rear that forced a rout.
In that one example, quite possibly. However, if you look at the 3 Punic Wars in general there is a mixture of Roman, Italian and non-Italian cavalry and it performs better or worse depending upon the engagement. It's not a binary Roman cavalry bad, everyone else good.

Quote:
As time went on the Roman Citizen Cavalry was used less and less with Barbarian Auxiliaries used instead
Indeed, as I indicated above; the Romans were aware that they were not particularly competitive in this field and as with their approach to most things, borrowed a more successful practice from elsewhere

Quote:
Julius Caesar was very fond of his German Cavalry, although his Gallic Cavalry normally out numbered them. Probably the best Roman answer was Barbarian Cavalry under Roman Officers.
He was not, of course, the first or the last. However, citizen cavalry continued to form part of the Roman Armies for a long period and cannot simply be written off as universally bad; as with Roman infantry, they had significant successes and significant failings. That the cavalry arm was increasingly out-sourced suggests that the Romans were well aware of the problem
Reply With Quote
Reply

Please bookmark this thread if you enjoyed it!


Thread Tools
Display Modes



Forum Jump

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 16:53.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.