View Single Post
  #23  
Old 14 Oct 16, 15:31
jf42's Avatar
jf42 jf42 is offline
Second Lieutenant
UK
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: London
Posts: 435
jf42 is on the path to success [1-99] jf42 is on the path to success [1-99] jf42 is on the path to success [1-99]
'Celt' is not a very helpful word in relation to the population of Scotland in the C18th; only being conceived as an ethnic label in the early part of that century.

As it is, David I of Scotland in the C12th , when issuing charters, used on occasion to address the people of his kingdom as "Scots, English, Welsh and the people of Galloway.

There is a distinction to be made between the colonists coming from Scotland in the C17th and C18th, and immigrants arriving in the wake of the '45 jacobite rising and the Highland Clearances of the later C18th and C19th, under a degree of duress (not that Scotland was a bed of blubells in previous centuries).

Catholicism used to be the dominant faith in the Highlands. The observed predominance of Presbyterianism in some areas of the Western Isles today is as a result of the removal of considerable proportion of the Highland population, after the defeat of Jacobitism and the Clearances. Military recruiting played its part, too, as well as economic migration to the industrial south, where sectarian rivalry still persists today.

I don't think the 'K' in KKK was a result of ignorance; more a foreunner of the Ezi-Kleen syndrome in American branding, informed by the need for a hard 'k' in 'Klu-Klux.'

The cap of the penitentes worn in autos-da-fe and by hooded Nazareņos in Holy Week are only superficially similar to Klan robes. Perhaps as the ritual practices of the Klan evolved someone took inspiration from religious ritual Spain, but I wonder if the Catholic association would have been attractive per se.


'The Wicker Man' has nothing to do with Scotland in the real world. The ritual that inspired the film was observed by Julius Caesar (IIRC) in Gaul. There were no druids in Gaul, or Caledonia for that matter, It is a comparitively modern term from Welsh, that has been applied to the religious caste observed by the Romans in southern Britain whose cult centre was in modern North Wales.

There were of course seasonal fire festivals throughout Europe some of which, as we know, survive today.
Reply With Quote