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Old 14 Aug 14, 19:24
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R.N. Armstrong R.N. Armstrong is offline
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R.N. Armstrong has earned the respect of all [900] R.N. Armstrong has earned the respect of all [900]
R.N. Armstrong has earned the respect of all [900] R.N. Armstrong has earned the respect of all [900] R.N. Armstrong has earned the respect of all [900] R.N. Armstrong has earned the respect of all [900] R.N. Armstrong has earned the respect of all [900] R.N. Armstrong has earned the respect of all [900]
Getting it right probably depends mostly on the author’s critical judgment. My quick guide for critical judgment is the exercise of the following eight elements:


1)Identify the sources of information. Determine which sources are primary and secondary. Who is the author for each source and determine the author’s experience and credentials as well as experience. When was the text written.
2)Establish the bona fides (good faith, honest intentions, genuine) of the work. Does the author have a blatant bias or agenda? Look at how the author documents his assertions in footnotes/end notes. Look at the bibliography and references for completeness—to do this one has to have a command of the subject and under state the issues, perspectives or points of argument. A key aspect in history is to see if the author has any new source material in comparison to the standard works, or is the author using the conventional sources but has a different interpretation. New information or reinterpretation of existing information may contradict or disagree with the conventional wisdom, and you will have to judge its efficacy.
3)You need a catholic (general) range of knowledge to place you subject in a greater context. Your research will expose you to the great range.
4)You must possess a trained perspective and ability to hold a number of different perspectives (yours and others)
5)You will use a sense of discernment for clarity in understanding differences, make fine distinctions roles, word choice, and meanings.
6)You must apply a certain skill of synthesis. This is important in our sound-byte society. You will mass a great deal of information in you research of the subject, and you will have to trim it to a meaning and direct presentation for clarity in your points and observations. You see other author’s perspectives and biases by what they leave out. Awareness of these choices is key to critical judgment. You see this in the nightly news.
7)Having a passing acquaintance with the uses of language. Beware of value-laden words, terms and expression.
8)And last, one must have an educated imagination for different times, situations. Imagination allows you to see a problem differently, appreciate perspectives, different roles. The values and perspectives of kings is quite different from peasants—the same is true in modern society.

In the end, there is no absolute truth, but you will have written in good faith and open to the critic's perspective. And, you will be able to judge the efficacy of their argument. Remember when you write, the critic will have the last word.
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Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.
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