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Old 04 Oct 17, 00:08
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruitt View Post
If you look further you might find that the same cannon is better known as the French 1897, made famous in World War I. The 75 came in a M2 and 3 which went into the M3 series tank and M4 series tanks. The gun was also lightened and modified to be fitted into B-25's and the M-24 tank. The gun could penetrate Mark III's and Mark IV's up to the G model.

The M6 was better known as a Infantry Support weapon. Newer 75 and 76 guns were better at armor piercing.

Pruitt
It was based on the French 1897 but it was longer and had a sliding block breech rather than a Nordenfelt screw breech. Essentially an M4's gun on a light tank - very good HE capability and decent AP for a light tank (as you noted). There was also WP and HC ammo for it. This puts it at the top of the list for firepower in WWII light tanks.
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