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Old 21 Jul 16, 09:54
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A report on the geology of Vermont from 1923-1924. Has sections on Grand Isle County and North Hero.

http://dec.vermont.gov/sites/dec/fil...erkins1924.pdf

Excerpt from page 38 of the PDF

ng north from Grand isle one comes to North Hero.
NORTH HERO.
The only beds found on this island are those of the Lpper
Trenton and they are very much like those seen over the northern
part of Grand Isle. Though for the most part the rocks of this
island do not yield any distinct fossils, vet there are a few localities
much richer than similar beds on the southern island.
At Hazen Point, and some rods north on the west shore and
1-libbard Point on the east shore, fossils may be found, but there
are only a few sliecies as Triarthrus, a few Graptolites, etc. ( see
Ruedemann's list following). The Graptolites seem to be more
abundant and more widely (listributed than other fossils in these
rocks.
In passing it may be noticed that the surface of North Hero
is low and, except along the shores, more or less covered by drift.
Nowhere is the land more than sixty feet above the lake and in
only a few places as much as this. Because of the soft and friable
nature of most of its rock, the shores of this island are very
irregular and greatly eroded by the waves of the lake.
The change from lower rock easily broken by the hammer
to that higher up, almost or quite to the surface, is very gradual
and in many places the eye cannot find any division. The strata
have in most places been very little disturbed and the upper clays,
formed by the decomposed shale, though soft and easily shovelled,
plainly sho\v the original layers. Still in a few places there is
considerable upheaval and the entire thickness, which has not
been carefully measured, must be several hundred feet. The
otitcrops of the shale on North Hero are taken tip in some (leta
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