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Old 28 Jun 14, 17:06
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Link to an article mainly about privateering, called "Commerce and Crime: States, Property Rights, and the War on Trade: 1700 -1815 by Christina Gathmann and Henning Hillmann

http://web.mit.edu/econsocseminar/ww...s_MIT20062.pdf

excerpt

Why do governments actively promote criminal behavior? History up to the present day provides
many examples where states have not suppressed but rather supported activities like extortion,
production of illegal commodities, smuggling or outright terrorism. Yet evidence strongly
suggests that the costs involved are dramatic: countries have lower economic growth and a high
potential for political conflict. This study uses new quantitative evidence on eighteenth-century
British and French privateering state-licensed piracy and commerce raiding by private ships
to identify the conditions under which states promote criminal and semi-legal activities, and how
these activities influence economic and political performance. Privateering is an institutional
arrangement that enforces property rights of domestic merchants but denies foreign merchants
the same rights. A selective property rights model is used to demonstrate how legalizing illegal
piracy as privateering was also a domestic political instrument that worked much like patron-
client networks in binding elites to the interests of state-building princes. For merchants,
privateering was a means to compensate for trade losses during war. For state-building rulers, it
provided a supplement to the navy at no cost and, in true mercantilist fashion, undermined the
trade of rival states.


Privateering and Piracy in the Colonial Period by J. Franklin Jameson

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/24882...-h/24882-h.htm

http://www.publicbookshelf.com/publi...ggeorg_ec.html

excerpt
n a few months after the declaration of war, the American waters swarmed with French privateers. Several were equipped at Louisburg, Cape Breton, with amazing despatch, and made a great number of prizes before vessels of war could arrive to protect the British colonial shipping. Louisburg became, in all respects, a kind of hornets' nest in regard to New England, its trade and fisheries, which it was now determined to dig out if possible.

Meanwhile, M. Duquesnel, governor of Cape Breton, embarked part of the garrison of Louisburg with some militia and made a descent upon the settlement of Canso, in Acadia, which he burnt, and made the garrison and settlers prisoners of war. He then summoned Annapolis, but was deterred from investing it by the arrival of a reinforcement from Massachusetts. Duquesnel returned to Louisburg, where he died shortly thereafter. Governor Shirley had for some time conceived the project of taking possession of Cape Breton, now rightly regarded as the seaward bulwark of Canada, and a highly-important post as a safeguard to the French fisheries and to American trade. The fortifications of Louisburg, the capital, even in their uncompleted state, had taken twenty-five years to construct, at a cost, it was reported, of thirty million livres (nearly one million five hundred thousand pounds sterling). They comprised a stone rampart nearly forty feet high, with embrasures for one hundred and forty-eight cannon, had several bastions, and strong out-works; and on the land-side was a fosse fully fourscore feet broad. The garrison, as reported afterwards by the French, was composed of six hundred regulars and eight hundred armed inhabitants, commanded by M. Duchambois. Upon the same authority we may mention here that at this time there were not more than one thousand soldiers in garrison, altogether, from the lower St. Lawrence to the eastern shore of Lake Erie.


http://www.capebretonpost.com/News/2...f-privateers/1





Last edited by lakechampainer; 29 Jun 14 at 14:21..
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