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Old 27 Jun 14, 11:06
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It is hard to find information about the raids by French privateers on New England ships and settlements(if any): the best overall description of the background I found in of all places History.com of the Weider History Group, from 2006.

http://www.historynet.com/king-georg...louisbourg.htm

excerpt 1

The early spring of 1745 saw New England preparing for war. Seaports bustled as a makeshift armada prepared to carry a newly raised, inexperienced colonial army of farmers, fishermen, merchants, and frontiersmen into battle. The unlikely objective was Louisbourg, a heavily fortified seaport and capital of the French colony of Ile Royale some six hundred miles northeast of Boston.*
Longstanding colonial rivalries between Great Britain and France fueled the expedition. By the mid-eighteenth century, Britain had driven Portuguese and Spanish fishermen from the rich Newfoundland banks; New Holland and New Sweden had become the British colonies of New York and Delaware; and many Native North Americans had been decimated and displaced. Among European powers, only the French to the north and the Spanish to the south contested the British dominance.
In the northeast, natural barriers separated the heartlands of New England and New France. Lake Champlain and the Hudson River offered a corridor between New York and Montreal, but the distance separating the rival settlements offered each a measure of security. Maine was disputed territory, claimed both by the New England colonies and by Acadian settlements on the Bay of Fundy.


excerpt 2


French privateers followed this success by attacking New England's fisheries and commerce. The raiders began by striking at rival vessels encountered off the Nova Scotia coast and eventually extended their reach down to New England itself. French warships on their way to and from Louisbourg also attacked New England shipping. But the British colonies soon replied with privateers of their own and, by August, had largely bottled up French shipping in Louisbourg

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From cato.org - Privateering and the Private Production of Naval Power

http://object.cato.org/sites/cato.or...5/cj11n1-8.pdf

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From Wikipedia - article on "Privateer"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privateer
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link to an article called "Sovereignty and Land Tenure: The Institutional Foundations of Land Development in Atlantica" by Robin Neill

http://economics.acadiau.ca/tl_files...Neill.2004.pdf

Last edited by lakechampainer; 27 Jun 14 at 12:21..
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