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-   -   Venezuela - getting worse all the time (http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=172707)

The Exorcist 09 Aug 16 00:46

Venezuela - getting worse all the time
 
Venezuela's new decree: Forced farm work for citizens

Quote:

It is a potent sign of tough conditions in Venezuela, which is grappling with the lack of basic food items like milk, eggs and bread. People wait hours in lines outsides supermarkets to buy groceries and often only see empty shelves.
Venezuela once had a robust agricultural sector. But under its socialist regime, which began with Hugo Chavez in 1999, the oil-rich country started importing more food and invested less in agriculture. Nearly all of Venezuela's revenue from exports comes from oil.
http://money.cnn.com/2016/07/29/news...ee-farm-labor/


What Is Life Really Like In Venezuela?

Quote:

The conditions have naturally led to looting and riots, and Venezuela's law enforcement apparatus is ill-equipped to deal with the crisis. The country already has high rates of violent crime, drug trafficking and corruption. Its capital city, Caracas, has been called the most dangerous in the world, with nearly 120 murders for every 100,000 people annually. Corruption is rampant. According to Human Rights Watch, one in every five crimes is committed by the police,

The health care system is on verge of collapse, too. According to multiple reports, even the major urban hospitals lack basic supplies like beds, needles, soap and even paper. Medicine is scarce and thousands have died from infections and treatable ailments.
http://www.seeker.com/what-is-life-r...951624383.html



Starving Venezuelans Break Into Zoo And Eat Equally Starving Animals

Quote:

Last week, groups of intruders broke into Caricuao Zoo in Caracas, Venezuela, pulled a rare black stallion from its cage, and slaughtered him there on the spot. They left behind only his head and ribs, which zookeepers found in the morning when they entered to care for the lone horse.
Earlier this month, Vietnamese pigs and sheep that called the zoo their home were stolen by citizens for food as well.
If the animals aren’t being stolen and butchered to feed the starving Venezuelan citizens, they’re dying from starvation themselves, as the zoos’ food shipments are few and far between.
Marlene Sifontes, a union leader at INPARQUES, the government agency that runs the Caricuao Zoo, told Reuters in a recent interview:
“The situation that our zoo is going through is very sad. We have animals that have not eaten for up to 15 days, which affects their health.”

Read More: http://www.trueactivist.com/starving...rving-animals/

Gixxer86g 09 Aug 16 05:11

Well, this is what the people wanted.

¡Estupido!

Gixxer86g 09 Aug 16 05:14

Her neighbors would be wise to shore up their borders.

Bass_Man86 09 Aug 16 10:48

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gixxer86g (Post 3254344)
Well, this is what the people wanted.

¡Estupido!

I am waiting for the dookie to hit the fan Jim, and when it does it will be ugly. Maduro forgot what happened to Mussolini.

MarkV 09 Aug 16 11:03

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bass_Man86 (Post 3254430)
I am waiting for the dookie to hit the fan Jim, and when it does it will be ugly. Maduro forgot what happened to Mussolini.

Perhaps he is hoping Castro will send somebody in to fly him out. Nicolae Ceaușescu might be a more applicable example.

T. A. Gardner 09 Aug 16 11:41

Is this the food line or the toilet paper line...?

http://capitalismisfreedom.com/wp-co...02.06-AM-1.jpg

Sounds like the later days of WW 2...

http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2016...gs-birds-food/

Quote:

Venezuelans Now Eating Cats, Street Dogs and Pigeons for Food
http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2014...-in-100-years/

Quote:

For the first time in its 100-year history of oil production, Venezuela is importing crude — a new embarrassment for the country with the world’s largest oil reserves.

The nation’s late president Hugo Chávez often boasted the South American country regained control of its oil industry after he seized joint ventures controlled by such companies as ExxonMobil and Conoco. But 19 months after Chávez’s death, the country can’t pump enough commercially viable oil out of the ground to meet domestic needs — a result of the former leader’s policies.

GRA 11 Aug 16 01:12

FOLKS ... what's going on in Venezuela is what happens to any society when they drink the communist kool-aid.

MarkV 11 Aug 16 07:07

Quote:

Originally Posted by GRA (Post 3255138)
FOLKS ... what's going on in Venezuela is what happens to any society when they drink the communist kool-aid.

Actually its what happens to any society when they become dependent on producing and selling a single natural resource and make no provision for when the bottom falls out of the market.

GRA 11 Aug 16 11:27

Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkV (Post 3255177)
Actually its what happens to any society when they become dependent on producing and selling a single natural resource and make no provision for when the bottom falls out of the market.

I agree that an economy that is not diversified leads to eventual disaster but this is not the main problem with this miserable country. They followed the socialist/communist path of Castro and other like-minded clowns and now they are suffering the consequences.

MarkV 11 Aug 16 11:42

Quote:

Originally Posted by GRA (Post 3255278)
I agree that an economy that is not diversified leads to eventual disaster but this is not the main problem with this miserable country. They followed the socialist/communist path of Castro and other like-minded clowns and now they are suffering the consequences.

Actually they didn't follow Castro's path - he did try and run a diversified economy even if it was on a cockeyed basis. He had to because the US embargos forced him to try and create a self sustaining economy. Chavez thought they were rich. Much more like Spain in the 16th and 17th century which thought that because they had all that New World Gold they didn't need to think about developing a decent economy.

GRA 11 Aug 16 12:37

Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkV (Post 3255284)
Actually they didn't follow Castro's path - he did try and run a diversified economy even if it was on a cockeyed basis. He had to because the US embargos forced him to try and create a self sustaining economy. Chavez thought they were rich. Much more like Spain in the 16th and 17th century which thought that because they had all that New World Gold they didn't need to think about developing a decent economy.

But Chavez was bottom-line socialist and that didn't work for them.

T. A. Gardner 11 Aug 16 17:43

Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkV (Post 3255177)
Actually its what happens to any society when they become dependent on producing and selling a single natural resource and make no provision for when the bottom falls out of the market.

That by comparison, isn't the problem with Venezuela and oil. It has far more to do with Chavez nationalizing oil production, stiffing companies like Exxon and Conoco on their investments there, and then suffering the consequences.
Everybody stopped buying Venezuelan oil. The major oil companies and related ones that work on oil fields stopped working in Venezuela or demanded hard cash payment up front from the government before they'd lift a finger.
Venezuela suddenly found they couldn't fix broken equipment, couldn't sell the oil they did pump, and ran out of cash almost immediately.

The same sort of idiocy permeated the rest of the economy. Companies couldn't make a profit so they folded. The government took them over but couldn't pay employees so they were unable to keep them working.

Price fixing at below market value on many items made them eventually unobtainable as companies refused to stock stuff they'd lose money on, importers demanded full payment up front, and the government couldn't pay subsidies on them due to lack of money.

MarkV 12 Aug 16 06:27

Given that most of the world's oil is produced by nationalised oil companies Saudi Aramco, Qatar General Petroleum Company, Petroleum Development Oman, Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, Kuwait Oil, Petrobras to name a few of the one's I've had dealings with I don't think that nationalisation alone is the answer. I do note however that those countries that used some of the oil money to build up investments elsewhere and to encourage the growth of other industries are weathering the current oil price crisis far better than those who treated it as a never ending source of funding for various political projects.

T. A. Gardner 12 Aug 16 17:52

True, it wasn't just the one thing. Venezuela also took most of the profits they were getting at $100 a barrel oil and shoved it into social-welfare state programs. These produce no ROI for the most part, if not entirely, and when oil fell to $40 a barrel or less, these programs wiped out what money reserves the country had.
But, with Venezuela officially taking a 60% tax on profits, many oil companies aren't even bothering to deal with Venezuela at all.

Other countries are weathering the market downturn better in good part because they aren't spending every last dime to subsidize their consumer economy or pay out welfare like Venezuela has been.

101combatvet 12 Aug 16 17:55

The oil boys are really hurting. Heard one the other day say, "I wish it would go up to $5.00 a gallon." :drink:


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